Jason Wells, owner of a range of high-end cafes around South London, admits his actions were "unacceptable, regardless of the situation"

Warning: this video contains A LOT of swearing

The driver involved in a heated argument with a cyclist on Priory Lane in Roehampton has issued a brief apology for his actions, in an altercation in which he threatened to break the rider’s neck.

Jason Wells tried to overtake the cyclist on the road towards Richmond Park on March 14 but took exception when the rider shouted at the close proximity of the pass.

The four-minute video, posted on May 30, sees both parties trading a volley of expletives before Mr Wells threatened to break the rider’s neck and later said he’d kill him after he hit the back of his Land Rover.

Mr Wells, who trained as a master butcher and now owns a range of high-end coffee shops, said today that he was sorry for his actions.

“I would like to apologise for any offence caused,” he said. “My behaviour was unacceptable and regardless of the situation, I shouldn’t react like that.

“I fully appreciate that cyclists have as much right to the road as any other road users.”

The London Evening Standard report that Mr Wells, an Australian ex-pat, lives in a £3m house in Richmond and owns the chain of Brew coffee shops in south-west London.

Many cyclists took to Twitter to say that they would be boycotting Mr Wells’s establishments in Clapham, Wimbledon, Putney and Wandsworth.

The Standard reports that Mr Wells refused to give a further comment when approached this morning. The Richmond and Twickenham Times say that Mr Wells voluntarily attended a police station about the incident but that he wasn’t arrested and enquiries are continuing.

  • Paul

    Mentioning the cycle lane in this way makes the driver more
    wrong. It says he knows what he is doing and feels it is justified because the cyclist
    should not be there. This could have
    easily been a lot worse and no one has the right to be the judge jury and
    possible executioner. He should be banned from driving.

  • Paul

    The way the apology is worded does not sound like much of an
    apology to me.

    Don’t think this is the first cyclist he will have done
    similar to and unlikely to be the last. He will just check a bit more for cameras.
    Someone like this does not just change overnight.

  • Jeremy Maccelari

    Nope. Not like you, sorry…

  • Michael

    Sheesh. You’re not very bright Jeremy.

  • Jeremy Maccelari

    From your concern over this trivial; issue, it’s obvious you actually do care a lot…

  • Michael

    Nah. Not like me.

    I couldn’t care less what other people feel about what I’ve done or haven’t done.

    However, unlike you, I recognise that this is not true of most people.

  • Jeremy Maccelari

    Like you, I suppose? And all the other sanctimonious sods like you,,,

  • Michael

    Clearly none of yours are.

    I’m sure you’ll find everyone is not like you and the cafe owner though – some people are genuinely sincere.

  • joe schmidt

    The mere existence of a nearby cycle path in no way precludes cyclists from using a road. Unless explicitly prohibited, cyclists are permitted to use all roads motor vehicles do. In addition to cyclists, dog walkers, people with baby carriages, and pedestrians tend to use cycle paths, and it is often safer to use a road where everyone (should) be paying more attention to their surroundings. Cyclists should make an effort to not impede traffic, but the ultimate goal is that everyone safely reach their destination. Clearly this motorist had other priorities.

  • joe schmidt

    This should be enough evidence for a permanent revocation of his driver’s license. Using public roads is a privilege, not a right, and clearly this man has too little control of his emotions to be trusted to safely operate a motor vehicle.

  • Roger

    Right. So “Brew cafes” is responsible for the actions of all 4×4 drivers? How does that work?

  • Roger

    Well I certainly agree that calls for violence, vandalism etc. are wrong. I wasn’t aware that that was going on.

    I never suggested other people weren’t capable of road rage. People get up to all kinds of things, many of which are incomparably worse than this. Nevertheless, that does not excuse the driver’s behaviour one bit. He nearly killed the cyclist (having been on the receiving end of a few “minor” bumps from cars, I can assure you it doesn’t take much to do serious damage to the human anatomy), then used his vehicle to block the cyclist, then threatened to kill him. That is not acceptable. The cyclist’s behaviour is hardly a mitigating factor.

  • Bikeyman

    The only thing he is sorry about is that the video went public. It’s a public relations, fake apology if i ever saw one. Furthermore, the use of cycle lanes is not compulsory and the cyclist has done nothing wrong.

  • The Awakening

    Jason Wells apology: “I would like to apologise for any offence caused,” he said. “My behaviour was unacceptable and regardless of the situation, I shouldn’t react like that.

    “I fully appreciate that cyclists have as much right to the road as any other road users.”

    Well done to Jason Wells, Brew Café owner, involved in the Richmond road rage incident, for apologising for his actions. It is refreshing when somebody finally admits to what they have done, was actually wrong.

  • Andrew Walsh

    Hmm. Well, you can moan about lack of facilities for cyclists in Britain, and lament the poor facilities that are provided. Why not ? And, in any case, as someone who lives in Germany, where there are wonderful bike paths, the police still advise cyclists who are likely to exceed 25 km/h to ride on the road (i.e. most sports cyclists), as cycle paths usually have to cross private access driveways etc. and the chance of an accident is therefore increased by riding on the bike path. And, of course, your right to ride on the road is enshrined by the law, as it is in Britain, and so the brainless buffoons driving one ton monsters who object to cyclists on the road are simply wrong, warped, ignorant, dangerous etc. As this guy is.

  • andrew crease

    OK he is not nice here.. I don’t think he is actually a physically violent person or he would have actually hit the cyclist, but maybe his employees might shed light on that.. I think he has anger issues and i think he might need to seek help as you can see he was frothing at the mouth, even wiping his own spit off his jacket, also in the back window of his car you can see the reflection of the cyclist and it appears he was also wiping saliva off his face…. I see that the large car was trapped right on the middle line of the road, with traffic coming the other way,.. so a combination of this and the guy having a bad day resulted in an unfortunate scene
    He is not fit to run a business or drive a car , that is obvious….if he gave up both, it would be a start- until then he should be reminded online of this video at every opportunity…. I hate this sort of attack on cyclists who really pose no real threat to a car driver…

  • Timothy Horgan

    The driver seems to have serious anger management issues. Should he then be allowed to possess a dangerous weapon on the public highway? He looked barking swivel-eyed mad on the video.

    It is clear from the video that he tried to force the cyclist off the road. I live near one of his caffs in Putney – I have had a look at the menu- it all looks very pricey and faux-trendy pretentiousness- I am not a cyclist but on principle I will not be spending any time or money with them. After this there will always be a whiff of “all fur coat and no knickers” about this guy .

  • Vaalid

    Imagine having a 3 million pound house and actually giving a fuck about trivial things like this lmao. Strange.

  • Mike Hawk

    i would rename the branches.mud sticks

  • It takes a big man to apologise – well done.

  • ron draycott

    Show your displeasure by contacting Brew cafes. All cyclists have experienced this sort of nonsense by 4×4 drivers and it cannot be tolerated.

  • pastyman

    I don’t see the point in spending money building the cycle paths and then the cyclists don’t use them. If they are designed badly then they should be changed.

  • Barney

    It’s simply not an apology. Apologising for “any offence caused” is not taking responsibility for your actions. “Regardless of the situation” is pretty much saying “he provoked me”, again, avoiding responsibility. A real apology acknowledges what happened and takes responsibility for it.

  • Barney

    Not a cycle lane, a shared path – a badly-designed and dangerous shared path that forces you to look in several different directions at junctions. Parents walk with toddlers there. It’s not a place to be doing 20mph+ on a bike, and cyclists have the legal right to use the road. I don’t regard it as “causing a problem myself” if I’m trying to a) not be injured and b) not injure others by choosing the safest appropriate thoroughfare. Do you ever avoid roads in your car because they’re either unsafe or prone to jams? Same principle. Are you causing a problem by doing so? No, you’re being a rational adaptive person.

  • pastyman

    End of the day the cyclist should be in the cycle lane. That’s what they are there for. Cyclists cause the problems themselves.

  • Lee Giles

    This is the comment I was looking for to agree with.

  • Arwyn Morgan

    How do you know his car was uninsured and untaxed? I haven’t seen that mentioned anywhere.

  • Flash Foster

    Handbags at 10 paces, what a pair of absolute dickheads, driver was in the wrong though. now realising that this could have backlash on his coffee shops, makes a crap girlie appology. Ha

  • Ajourney

    If Wells has committed a crime then it’s a matter for the police and courts, not the social media lynch mob. If he hasn’t committed a crime, then he’s apologised, and we should move on….
    There are people on these sites calling for violence against Wells, for his property to be vandalised, and for his business to be boycotted. This is wicked vigilantism.
    And YES people do ‘give a damn’ about threatening words being published about them to massive audiences on social media, especially ones which incite violence and hate, along with factual details including addresses, businesses, number plates etc. That’s why people go to the police about it.
    And if you don’t believe other people are capable of this type of road rage behaviour then you clearly lead a very sheltered life. Presumably you failed to notice the cyclist’s own swearing, threating behaviour etc. Yes, people act like this all the time on the UK’s crowded roads. The best thing about this incident between two angry road users who both ‘lost it’ is that nobody got hurt.

  • Allan

    It is what happens when you get 2 highly charged individuals conflicting with each other. I have been there as both a cyclist and a van driver, and always regretted the loss of control afterwards.
    Cycle paths are OK for families going out for a pootle with their kids, but are really a box ticking exercise that serve no useful service to the vast majority of serious road cyclists; they make you leave the road, then re-enter at various points, potentially putting you in danger of coming into conflict with unaware drivers. Drivers need to be more aware of cycling issues and certainly be constantly space aware, and cyclists need to be more understanding of the frustrations felt by people in their cars, who are trying to go about their journey unhindered.
    We all need to be more forgiving towards people when their frustrations boil over into angry exchanges…move on, nobody got hurt.

  • Roger

    “Allowed to move on”? What on earth do you mean? Do you reckon he gives the slightest damn about what people say on “social media”? I certainly wouldn’t if I were he.

    Anyway, when you are driving a car on the same road as other vulnerable users, there is no excuse for “losing it” the way he did. That kind of behaviour is not normal or acceptable and to suggest that it is is bizarre.

  • Ajourney

    Beyond the poor driving, and the unpleasant language used by both men, the way Wells is being torn apart by a hate mob on social media is vile. He lost it, just as millions of otherwise decent people do every day of the week (humans are like that, all of them). His apology following a minor road incident in which nobody was hurt is perfectly adequate – he’s accepted his public humiliation, and should be allowed to move on. He’s clearly learnt his lesson by now…….I don’t drive a car, cycle everywhere, and despise 4x4s but – boy – I also hate the lynch mob mentality of social media.

  • Lyle

    The Police Would Have Just Sent Him On His Way they are useless, I Was Involved in An Accident In January When a Car entering a roundabout, Hit Me Side On at 35mph when I was going around roundabout , Police Decided Not to Take Any Action and it took me a Month to get Drivers Details beacuse of “Data Protection”. To Make it worse police attitude at the scene was disgusting first thing I got asked when on a spinal board in ambulance was what are YOU gonna do about your bike it can’t stay in the road.

  • Matt Caulfield

    Do you mean the cycle lane that is in fact dangerous, ineffective and only leads you to be back on the same stretch of road anyway? Contrary to popular belief just painting some pavement doesn’t make a proper bike lane, that lane is nothing more than some paint and a pat on the back for making the area “more bike accessible.” You wouldn’t have it if roads were potholed, filled with glass and inherently dangerous due to the position they put the users in, why should cyclists be forced into the same position because some people can not operate a vehicle correctly?

  • Skellum

    Its a public road. Buy your own road if you want it to yourself.

  • RH

    The cyclist had every right to be on the road, unlike the driver, whose car was uninsured and untaxed. Anyway it is irrelevant. Just because you think someone has done sonething wrong, that does not give you the right to endanger his life and threaten to kill him.

    And calling strangers on the web “morons” is just sad.

  • Matt Cross

    clearly pointed out… he cut the cyclist up in a 2 ton vehicle… He threatened to kill him, break his neck if there wasn’t any witnesses around… He’s an angry, arrogant little man….

    I think cycle paths are aimed at cyclists who aren’t confident on the road and one would generally ride much slower on a path.. You don’t get many road riders using cycle paths at 20mph+ because you would endanger other users of the cycle path…

  • Matt Cross

    He’s apologising purely down to public relations so ultimately it doesn’t effect business profit..

  • Matthew Lee

    What a bunch of morons you all are, the driver clear pointed out the fault of why the cyclist shouldn’t have been on the road and clearly the cycle lane was there for a reason.

  • oggie679

    OK so the driver was originally in the wrong for cutting him off (but also has a point about the cycle path – you can’t moan about not having them and then not use them).
    They both overreact but the cyclist was ridiculous – he was the one who first threatened violence, continuously lifting his bike over the driver’s head like it was going to throw it at him and keeping the agression going – it’s just that the driver looked more menacing (and is the evil driver). The cyclist was so irate he wasn’t even coherent and completely lost it. This is from someone speaking from experience on both sides of the situation and I think that if the driver is going to apologise, the cyclist should too.

  • Danielle Baker

    OK so the driver was originally in the wrong for cutting him off (but also has a point about the cycle path – you can’t moan about not having them and then not use them).
    They both overreact but the cyclist was ridiculous – he was the one who first threatened violence, continuously lifting his bike over the driver’s head like it was going to throw it at him and keeping the agressoin going – it’s just that the driver looked more menacing! The cyclist was so irate he wasn’t even coherent and completely lost it. This is from someone speaking from experience on both sides of the situation and I think that if the driver is going to apologise, the cyclist should too.

  • ummm…

    yeah it is easy for us to say that. But, we weren’t nearly run over, then cut up, by an SUV. I feel for him now because he is getting shamed on the interwebs. However, my empathy sometimes leads me to forgive too quickly. I just hope he has a better attitude towards cyclists in the future and doesn’t use his vehicle as a weapon, as he did when he used it as a barrier.

  • David Hancock

    Tough. As a decent cyclist, we are SICK of the violent abuse by motorists such as this and using their vehicles as a weapon. The police should do their job and charge him on several legitimate counts. A shame his number plate and business have been revealed.

  • Jon O’Neill

    i really don’t know what to say, i watch this video and i hardly could hold back my rage of the abuse which was handed out. if the so call government want more people exercising and using a healthier way to travel to work, than they need to start a huge campaign to educate drivers, who sit in a 1 ton vehicle in comfort to ease off and take your time and remember you the person behind the wheel have a duty of care to all on the road.

  • Jeremy Maccelari

    You tell me how many apologies are unselfish! Very few… I just get a bit p.o.’d when a baying mob starts kicking a man when he’s down. Yep – he ****ed up. He has apologised. Now it’s time for the lynch mob to put down their pitchforks and move on with their lives…

  • Derek Biggerstaff

    How can it “not matter”? It is simply not an apology if the motives are selfish.

  • Jon O’Neill

    i really don’t know what to say, i watch this video and i hardly could hold back my rage of the abuse which was handed out. if the so call government want more people exercising and using a healthier way to travel, than they need to start a huge campaigh to educate drivers, who sit in a 1 ton vehicle in comfort, to ease off and take your time and remember you the person behind the wheel have a duty of care to all on the road.

  • dodgerking

    When your business may be hurt due to your behavior, of course you will apologize. Is this apology really because you realized your were wrong and take full responsibility; or was it due to the fact that people now know who you are and it may hurt your business?

  • hailpantani

    Sorry – this isn’t enough. If the police haven’t arrested this man for dangerously breaking the Highway Code and then compounding it by threatening a member of the public, just what do you need to do to get arrested? I had a similar situation where an Audi driver entering an large island from the left nearly hit me as I was about to exit the island. I was on the island long before he came from the left at high speed. He would have hit me side on if I hadn’t stopped ON THE ISLAND, which was unsafe in itself, but was the lesser of two evils. He then launched a tirade at me for presumably having the temerity of being on the road – and accused ME of upsetting his wife. Incredible. I have had a bellyful of this type of driver. They clearly haven’t the intelligence to realise that if they sideswipe a rider with their 1-ton vehicle, the rider will probably be injured by throwing them onto the road or into the path of another vehicle.

  • Jeremy Maccelari

    At least he had the decency to apologise – not matter what his motives.

  • Namothy

    “I’m terribly sorry that the exposure of my true nature means I may potentially lose income”

  • Namothy

    “I’m terribly sorry that the exposure of true nature means I may potentially lose income”

  • Apologises are the minimum, but that’s already good…even if it’s to save his business

  • Yahya Dai

    Because of “boycotting” huh !

  • DP

    Sorry mate. Your true colors have been shown.