The wearer of the white jersey at the Tour de France pulled the classic 'tap on the opposite shoulder' trick. Read on for more of the best cycling videos from around the internet

Julian Alaphilippe (Etixx-Quick Step) went on French television after a long stage at the Tour de France, and entertained himself and the viewers while he was there.

Confusing the host, he tapped him on the opposite shoulder and then pretended to know what had happened.

I laughed.

Try watching it, Tom!

Tom Dumoulin (Giant-Alpecin) made his feelings known about the long slow days at the Tour  after the finish of stage four, but also gave some feedback while out on his bike during stage three.

Stage three certainly wasn’t one to watch all the way through, with only the last 10km or so providing any real entertainment.

Incredible skills

Wheelies over the finish line are one thing, but this is a step above. It’s interesting that the video came to a halt before the BMX trickster had dismounted from the handlebars… hopefully they didn’t fall of.

Not something you’d expect to see on British roads

Poorly controlled dogs and adventurous livestock are about all we have to contend with in terms of wildlife on British roads, but for these riders in Singapore things were a bit more exotic.

Riding down what looks like a fast forest road, the cyclists had to dodge and weave their way through some sitting monkeys.

Three time Tour winner’s bike?

Chris Froome (Team Sky) is presently defending his Tour de France crown and hoping to take his third overall win.

This is the machine he will spend most of the Tour on (plus his TT bike), so can it carry him all the way to Paris as the victor?

What to expect in the coming days

Stages seven to nine of the 2016 Tour de France take us into the Pyrénées, where the GC men should come to the front and start the overall battle in earnest.

Get the lowdown on these three important stages, and let us know what you’re expecting to happen as the road heads upwards.

Balanced reporting

London’s cycle superhighways have caused more controversy than they really should have, but already their benefits are clear to see from the number of riders using them to get around the city in safety.

However, some media outlets are getting on the bicycle bashing bandwagon and trying to stoke up ‘us and them’ resentment between cyclists and people who don’t cycle (yet).

In response to the tweet below, YouTube user sw19cam posted the above video of the very same cycle lane during a busy period.

The light sequences haven’t been ironed out yet, so some riders are left waiting up to three minutes for a green. As such, sometimes stretches of the segregated route can seem empty of users, until they all come through at once on the green light.

Logic is suspended when emissions free bicycles are blamed for the emissions coming out of motor vehicles.

No two sprinters are the same

As highlighted in our talking points from stage four of the Tour de France, Marcel Kittel (Etixx-Quick Step) and Bryan Coquard (Direct Energie) have very different sprinting techniques.

The big German’s upper body is almost stock still while the diminutive French rider rocks all over the place.

Kittel came out on top this time but if the course had been about one metre longer Coquard probably would have overhauled him.