The doctor, who is best known for his association with Lance Armstrong, is due back in court early next year for allegedly assisting an Italian biathlete to dope

Michele Ferrari, who is best known for his alleged part in Lance Armstrong‘s systematic doping campaign, is once again facing court action for his dealings with an athlete.

This time round the Italian doctor has been accused of assisting Italian biathlete Daniel Taschler by giving advice on how to take EPO during the 2010-2011 winter season.

The story was broken by Gazzetta dello Sport. The Italian newspaper also published details of an alleged phone call where the doctor tells the athlete, according to the Bolzano public prosecutor, how to use the performance enhancing drug; reportedly telling him to inject “in the vein”.

This new court case surfaced as a result of the investigation that led to the discovery of payments between Armstrong and Ferrari. This and other evidence was used in USADA’s reasoned decision that saw the then seven times Tour de France champion stripped of all titles.

A third defendant is involved in this latest case, Daniel’s father Gottlieb Taschler. The older Taschler is vice president of the International Biathlon Union and is accused of putting his son in touch with the notorious doctor, who was banned from practising by the Italian Cycling Federation as far back as 2002.

Ferrari was most recently in the headlines for his attempts to block the release of ‘The Program’, the Stephen Frears directed film about Armstrong’s doped Tour de France ‘wins’.