Team Sky's Richie Porte commends the actions of Simon Clarke and Michael Matthews despite them landing him a two-minute penalty

Richie Porte admits he didn’t know about the rule that stung him with a two-minute penalty on Tuesday’s stage 10 of the Giro d’Italia, but says he can’t change the situation now.

Porte accepted a front wheel from fellow Australian Simon Clarke, riding for Orica-GreenEdge, in the final kilometres of stage 10 when he suffered a puncture.

The race jury, however, decided the act of sportsmanship contravened UCI Rule 12.1.040, which states riders are not allowed to provide ‘non-regulation assistance to a rider of another team’.

“[My reaction was] one of shock and disbelief, but rules are rules. I didn’t know about that rule but there’s nothing we can do now to change the situation.

“I commend my good mates Simon Clarke and Michael Matthews for helping out – that was a great picture of cycling but the jury see it differently. Hopefully it’s the same rules for everybody.”

  • Hugh Strickland

    Bad application of a bad rule. You would think someone got a check for Tinkov.

  • Hugh Strickland

    Bad application of a bad rule. You would think someone got a check for Tinkov.

  • John Airey

    Trouble is this rule is broken all the time! Whenever a group breaks away from the peloton (excuse my literal French) members from different teams assist each other to keep ahead of the chasing teams. Where’s the difference?

    I’m trying to figure out why this rule even exists.

  • John Airey

    Trouble is this rule is broken all the time! Whenever a group breaks away from the peloton (excuse my literal French) members from different teams assist each other to keep ahead of the chasing teams. Where’s the difference?

    I’m trying to figure out why this rule even exists.

  • Man in motion

    In an unrelated event, another rider was penalised for being pushed, in a show of sportmanship, up the hill by a bystander. “He seemed like he was struggling and I thought he could benefit from a little push” said the good samaritan.

    But, you see, a show of sportmanship (as the article calls it) may be in the intention, I don’t doubt that. But it is actually poor sportmanship when a rider is provided with a treatment that is not granted to the rest (at leaast to the rest of the GC contenders). Granted, Porte had bad luck with the puncture. This is something that could’ve happened to anyone else. Let’s say it had happened to Aru, would Clarke had given his wheel to Aru in the same sportmanship spirit? I think most of us know the answer: not unless he was eating a vegemite sandwich. So Porte was being provided with an extra safety net, a 10th rider on his team, something others don’t. We are passing the “bad luck I had a puncture” wieght to “bad luck I didn’t have a countryman near by from another team”, are we not?