Tinkoff-Saxo rider Roman Kreuziger has published some of his blood data on a website ahead of his CAS doping hearing

Tinkoff-Saxo rider Roman Kreuziger has taken the step of publishing his blood data online ahead of his hearing at the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

The Czech, who finished fifth in the 2013 Tour de France, was temporarily suspended by his team in June 2014 after the UCI raised questions about abnormalities in his biological passport.

While the Czech Olympic Committee cleared Kreuziger of any wrongdoing, WADA and the UCI appealed to CAS in October, returned for four races in October before the appeal was lodged.

Kreuziger has now published some of his data on the website kreuzigercase.cz, restating his claim that any abnormality may have come from the medication he takes for an underactive thyroid.

“I have never tested positive for doping. Despite this for a year and a half now I have been living in uncertainly as to whether I will be able to continue to devote myself to my life’s passion and continue with my career,” Kreuziger writes in an open letter.

“I condemn doping and cheating in sport. I consider the biological passport to be an excellent tool. However, clear rules for its use must be set out otherwise it is useless and can be used to eliminate anyone.”

In 2013, Kreuziger admitted to having worked with Dr Michele Ferrari between 2006-2007, claiming he didn’t know the Italian was banned.