Orica-GreenEdge’s rising Brit all-rounder favours a larger frame

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Simon Yates rides the Scott Addict Team Issue equipped with Shimano Di2 drivetrain with Dura-Ace chainset and SRM power meter.

Chain catcher: Orica-GreenEdge chain catcher is made by K-Edge

Chain catcher: Orica-GreenEdge chain catcher is made by K-Edge

Scott claims a weight of 790 grams for its frame and 300 grams for the fork. The frame uses Scott’s proprietary truncated aerofoil section tubing which differs from the more usual aeronautical tubing shapes to reflect the much lower speeds attained on a bike.

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There’s a 1 1/8 to 1 1/4 inch tapered steerer for increased steering precision while still maintaining a comparatively narrow front-end profile. The seatpost is round rather than having an aero cross-section and is relatively narrow with a diameter of 27.2mm.

Simon Yates's Scott Addict back end

Stay-mounted rear brake: The rear brake is also a standard mount rather than being placed out of the airflow

The Addict’s frame unsurprisingly has race geometry and a short head tube. Yates rides a larger frame size relative to his height than is favoured by many pros, resulting in quite a short seatpost extension. A Fizik Antares R1 saddle sits on top.

Downwards stem

Pro negative angle stem: Yates runs a stem with a negative angle to place the bars as low as possible

Pro negative angle stem: Yates runs a stem with a negative angle to place the bars as low as possible

To compensate for the larger frame, he uses a -17 degree negative angle stem to place his handlebar lower relative to the saddle. He also uses a traditional bar rather than the more usual semi-compact or ergonomic designs.

Simon Yates's Scott Addict gears

Rear triangle: Broad chainstays with integral carbon dropouts for power transfer

Here Yates is running Shimano Dura-Ace C35 carbon rims shod with Continental Competition Pro Ltd tubulars. The bike is finished off with a pair of Elite Cannibal bottle cages.

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The commercially available bike weighs 6.28kg, without a power meter, so Yates’s bike is probably close to the UCI’s 6.8kg minimum weight limit.