The number of cycling journeys made in London rose by five per cent to 610,000 a day, the equivalent of 23m per year

Numbers of cyclists in London are at their highest ever level, according to figures released by Transport for London and that injuries and deaths are at their lowest level.

The total number of cycling journeys rose by five per cent in the latest figures to 610,000 a day – equating to 23 million journeys a year.

Statistics also show that 432 cyclists were killed or seriously injured on the capital’s roads, a figure that Mayor Boris Johnson says is “unacceptably high”.

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The Mayor of London said: “These figures are tremendously encouraging and will, I hope, give even more people the confidence to get on their bikes.

“Operation Safeway, which we made permanent feature last year, has already helped improve driver and cyclist behaviour. But we need to do more.

“The cyclist population explosion in London shows why we need all this and why we need to go still further.”

The London Cycling Campaign welcomed the numbers but insists there is still room for improvement in the capital’s cycling infrastructure.

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Rosie Downes, campaigns manager at the LCC, told the BBC: “It is heartening that the number of people killed or seriously injured while cycling has fallen, but the figures are still unacceptably high.

“The growth in cycling is welcome, and highlights the urgent need for London’s streets to offer safe space for cycling for all.”

TfL figures also show that 67 cyclists died on London’s roads between 2010 and 2014, with another six fatalities having already occurred in 2015.