Six nations also placed on the authority's anti-doping 'watch list' which could put Olympic place under threat

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The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has declared that the national anti-doping bodies of six countries, including Russia, are non-compliant with the WADA code.

Andorra, Israel, Argentina, Bolivia and Ukraine were unanimously voted, along with Russia, as non-compliant to the 2015 code by the WADA Foundation Board.

Russia found itself on the list, with its Olympic place under threat, because of the key recommendations of an Independent Commission into the widespread doping in Russian athletics.

Bolivia, Ukraine and Argentina were found to be using non-accredited laboratories, while Israel and Andorra were judged not to have the rules of the code in place.

“The message from today’s seminal WADA Foundation Board Meeting is clear,” said WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, “there will now be greater focus on strengthening compliance work so that all anti-doping organizations worldwide are held accountable to deliver robust anti-doping programs.

“As we have seen from WADA’s immediate response to the Independent Commission’s Report, action is now well under way to right wrongs that exist in anti-doping. Our priority is now on ensuring all our partners are fully compliant and have watertight anti-doping systems that protect clean athletes and reassure sports fans worldwide.

“Make no mistake, we will not rush this process of compliance, we will do it right – the integrity of sport is under threat.”

“Anti-doping in sport is under the spotlight today like never before, and WADA, along with our partners, have begun the work needed on the road to recovery for Russia. The world is watching and we have acted.”

In addition to those countries deemed not up to scratch with the WADA code, six other countries were placed under strict conditions in regards to anti-doping policy, which they must adhere to by March 2016 if they are to resist falling into the non-compliant list.

Belgium, France, Greece, Mexico, Spain as well as the 2016 Olympic Games hosts Brazil, were all placed on the world authority’s watch list.

The Foundation Board also voted to strengthen the agency’s ability to conduct international investigations, after an Independent Commission successfully uncovered the doping among Russian athletes earlier this month.

The WADA Athlete Commission was also supportive of the move, which will see WADA potentially move its investigation into other sports in Russia, possibly including cycling.

“We will conduct the necessary meetings with the Russian authorities in respect of the non-compliance status of RUSADA that tests athletes in all sports within Russia,” President Reedie said.

“A WADA expert team will then meet with the task of ensuring the continuation of testing in Russia. Any information brought forward to me as a result will allow me to make a considered decision on whether or not to extend the Independent Commission’s mandate.

“The theme of the day has clearly been investigations. I will now write to all public authority stakeholders and ask them to make further contributions specifically to fund anti-doping investigations. Following any commitments made, I will then immediately approach the IOC to seek matching funding.”