Pat McQuaid, president of the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), is facing fresh problems from within his own organisation after a dossier was produced on him and his leadership.

The dossier was produced by Management Committee member and former USA Cycling president Mike Plant, detailing McQuaid’s actions during the USADA investigation and resulting fall out.

According to Inside the Games, the dossier was given to other members of the UCI’s management committee at a recent meeting in Bergen, Norway after McQuaid had tried, unsuccessfully, to block it.

The information has not been made public, although Brian Cookson, President of British Cycling wrote on his blog; “I have to respect the confidentiality of the Management Committee with regards to the contents of the dossier. But what I can say is that I was disturbed by what I heard and I have been assured it will be properly investigated.”

Cookson is a member of the management committee and McQuaid’s sole competition in the September elections.

Plant, a former USA Cycling president, explained that the UCI is now at a “critical turning point … and strong, credible leadership has never been more important.”

“In private discussions with the UCI President and fellow members of the Management Committee, I have made my reasons, findings and concerns clear to him and my colleagues,” Plant told Inside the Games.

“The impact of the decisions being made today will be felt for generations to come. What the sport of cycling needs most at this crucial time in its history is to be guided by a consistent set of values. This isn’t a time for self-interest; this is a time for doing what is in the best interest of the sport.”

McQuaid’s bid for a third term as UCI president has been fraught. Cycling Ireland rescinded its initial nomination after a successful challenge was made by a member of the board based on a technicality.

Last weekend McQuaid was defeated by members of Irish cycling clubs in a vote at an Extraordinary General Meeting. Both Stephen Roche and Sean Kelly had publically supported McQuaid but the endorsement wasn’t enough.

The Irishman is now relying on a nomination from the Swiss federation – where he is resident – although not even that is assured.