Chris Froome manages to stay upright as he bumps shoulders with another rider at high speed in the final stages of the Critérium du Dauphine stage one

Chris Froome almost saw his Critérium du Dauphiné aspirations come crashing down in the final three kilometres of stage one on Monday, narrowly avoiding crashing twice in quick succession.

The Team Sky leader was at the front of the peloton trying to stay out of trouble, but that’s exactly what he found when he nudged shoulders with an Orica-GreenEdge rider.

The Orica rider had, in turn, nudged shoulders with a Katusha rider and then edged into Froome’s path. Froome leant into the collision and then almost lost control as he ricocheted off to the right.

https://twitter.com/CyclingHubTV/status/739842453277179904

As he moved across the road he corrected his line only to see the Orica and Katusha riders moving across the road in front of him, forcing Froome to take yet more evasive action.

Decked out in the red and white polka dot jersey, Froome stayed upright until the finish line and remains third overall in the general classification. Nacer Bouhanni (Cofidis) won the stage to Saint Vulbas.

  • Michael

    Hmm, not really. You’ve just taken a factual news story about a collision and added some invented guff of your own.

  • Sutton Atkins

    Which statement?

  • Paul Jakma

    Froome crashed into an elderly pedestrian and put the elderly man into hospital with serious injuries, riding home from a TT, stem-staring and not looking. So he has a lot of form on that.

    That said, Froome is a pretty good bike handler. He held his own on the descents in the Tour last year no problem, even passing people to keep with the lead descenders. He kept it right side up the other year even when Contador was running off road immediately in front of him.

    His bike handling generally is fine. His stem watching, not looking where he’s going, when putting out power, is an issue.

    (I’m not invested in Froome-fandom in any way; I also have my own issues with stem watching tendencies! ; ) ).

  • llos25

    I suppose it is to keep a SKY presence there is only Froome who shows his worth the rest failed miserable again on the second stage.

  • Eric Lehman

    Even the commentators, Bob Rolle specifically, wondered why Froome was in the mix at the front of the peleton with less than 3 km to go.

  • ummm…

    your right. it isn’t nice and i dont like it when people disregard my arguments in order to insult me. But your arguments themselves are childish and insulting. If you want to marry CF you can go to Ireland and do it now.

  • J1

    Kruijswijk ruined an interesting Giro trying to descend with the best.

  • J1

    Hey, he had a strong 34th place at the 2009 Giro, before he joined Sky and placed 2nd in the 2011 Vuelta.

  • J1

    The GC guys stay at the front to avoid crashes, once the 3km to go mark has gone they shouldn’t care too much as long as they don’t lose a load of time, but some GC guys will try to be at the front even right near to the finish, to try and gain a slight time advantage over their rivals.

  • Phil Hall

    He looks like Zola Budd on a bike.

  • Sutton Atkins

    Throwing personal insults? Now that’s embarrassing.

  • danox82

    I agree with those comments to an extent, but on the flipside…how many times have you seen Nibali pull away from someone like Froome, Contador or Quintana going up a mountain (other than when someone has a mechanical, like Froome did in last year’s TdF)?

    Nibali maybe able to gain a little on the descents over his rivals due to his better bike handling, but he tends to lose more time on his main rivals going up hill.

    As for doping allegations, I’m not getting embroiled in that storm 🙂

  • llos25

    This comment was meant for Sutton Atkins.

  • llos25

    Have you proof of that statement .

  • Eric Lehman

    Nibali’s descending skills are among the best ever. He has won races on downhill attacks. Look it up. Contador also can attack a descent, but not as good as Nibali. Froome ranks behind both, and comes up well short compared to Nibali.

  • Supong Longchar

    Nibali only edges Chris in descends that also minuscule other then that how can you compare a rider juiced up to the brim with a moral human.

  • Supong Longchar

    He handled well so he survived ….see the erratic speed of pelaton.

  • ummm…

    lmfao…..WOW.

  • ummm…

    your a grown man. it is embarrassing that you are such a fanboy

  • Michael

    Not really.

    All the pros have crashes and there are crashes near the end of stages relatively frequently.

    e.g Both Froome and Contador crashed out of the same TdF.

    Some people may have focussed on his crashes, but you could create a similar montage of plenty of other cyclists. Cav, for example.

    I think it boiled down to him supposedly staring at his stem, and then when he crashed once a commentator did 2+2=5 and connected something that wasn’t really connected.

    Similarly for the way his elbows appear. If these people looked they’d see it’s really just because of the way he grips his hoods.

  • Josh Tambini

    As was mine, I’ve just realised.

  • Rupert the Super Bear

    And there was me thinking that lovely Alex fellow had bought the Chaves family a nice new house back in Colombia.

  • Josh Tambini

    I didn’t realise it was a rhetorical question.

  • Sutton Atkins

    He didn’t fall off. That’s kinda the point.

  • Josh Tambini

    Because he’s always falling off it?

  • Sutton Atkins

    In lab tests of GW1516, subjects could exercise 44% longer at an elevated rate. Isn’t that what Nibali did on the last day of the Giro? (Yeah I agree, AICAR is more for loosing weight, and wouldn’t have a dramatic effect overnight.)

  • Eric Lehman

    Not really. Aicar is more of a longer term PED. Users often appear abnormally thin (even for pro cyclists) without reduced power #s. If Nibali did something, it more likely was some microdose to boost his hematocrit or something similar with a more immediate payoff.

    Cheers.

  • Romain Mousset

    Morten answer my emails

  • Sutton Atkins

    WADA have a test for both compounds, since 2010. Russian cyclist and others have been caught for it recently. I guess Froome has been tested more than them.

  • Sutton Atkins

    You should also know that:
    ““tests on rats showed that at all doses, the drug rapidly causes cancers in a multitude of organs, including the liver, bladder, stomach, skin, thyroid, tongue, testes, ovaries and womb.””

    “And there are some drawbacks to AICAR use. For a start, it’s very expensive — somewhere in the vicinity of half a million euro for a treatment in a lab in Vienna, according to French paper Libération. There’s also a suggestion that athletes using AICAR would see a significant increase in lactic acid creation. And finally, only limited testing has been done on humans when it comes to AICAR so there might be further complications we don’t even know about yet.”

  • Sutton Atkins

    I’m not a Froome fan. Nor a Nibali fan. I’m a cycling fan.

    But your point about AICAR/GW1516 is a little facile… What about when Sky gets beat? Yesterday Contador beat Froome. Clean? And if the testing is not up to scratch for AICAR/GW1516, even though there has been a test for it since 2007, then it would seem that this would be a perfect drug for Nibali to use int he Giro when the chips were down.

    So then we come to a point where they are all doped and we can all turn the TV off.

    For me, Nibali ruined a very interesting Giro with blatant doping.

  • Eric Lehman

    I’m not a NIbali fan, so I have no horse in that race. He is, though, without question one of the best bike handlers in the pro peleton. I find it funny when the Froome fanboys are quick to call out suspected dopers but turn a blind eye to Froome and Team Sky when they churn out questionable performances, i.e. Geraint in TDF. In my opinion, Froome/Wiggins transformations seem consistent with AICAR/GW1516 use. Then there is Froome’s AX3 ride that places him right in the mix with doped efforts of the previous generation.

  • Sutton Atkins

    Not Miraculous. It took years. He’s always had the engine, as proven by his testing results released form a few years ago, and then he lost 7kg to raise his Power to Weight ratio. It’s a lot more believable than what happened to Nibali in the space of 4 days… losing 2 mins to the main men on a 10km TT, then blowing them away. But yea, Vino’s doctor had nothing to do with that.

  • Eric Lehman

    While Froome’s miraculous transformation from a midpack GC rider to a GT champion is beyond question? Oh yeah, bilharzia right? GTFO.

  • Sutton Atkins

    Nibali has 10x the blood cells Froome has. (as proven by his “miraculous” recovery from “can’t follow” to “riding away from everyone 48 hours later” in the Giro… ) Contador has 10x the Clenbuterol, of Froome.

  • Sutton Atkins

    The OG guy moved his hips and nudged Froome’s handle bars. Anyone would have wobbled at that. Why are people saying he can’t handle his bike? It was a good save. Twice.

  • Eric Lehman

    Nibali is 10x the bike handler Froome is. Contador is better too.

  • CanSomeoneTellMe

    Froomey has shown he is an excellent bike handler once again…remember him staying upright when Nibali tried to take him down and also when Contador’s poor descending skills almost took him down. Froomey is awesome!!

  • Morten Reippuert Knudsen

    its both handling and reading the race. Basicly, its just like Kruijswijk on stage 19. Don’t try do do what on your bike if you dont have the skill for it… Kruijswijk almost took a few riders down on stage 8 on several ocasions — but that was not nearly as dangerous as what Frome almost did today.

  • Morten Reippuert Knudsen

    mr. sticky elbows is an elephant in a glasshouse and a rel danger to his fellow riders. He should not be allowed to in a group ride with more than 20 riders – and if he wants to ride in a larger group he should ride ahead or stay in the back.

  • tim

    no handling problem .did well to stay upright.

  • llos25

    I think he has problems handling a bike especially in a group.