Under UCI rules, Richie Porte has been sanctioned for accepting 'non-regulation assistance' when he changed wheels with Simon Clarke of Orica-GreenEdge

Team Sky leader and Giro d’Italia favourite Richie Porte has received a sanction of two minutes and 200 Swiss Francs for receiving help from a rival team, Orica-GreenEdge, during stage 10 of the race to Forlì. Simon Clarke, the Orica rider that helped him, has also been sanctioned for the same amount.

After Porte punctured his front tyre in the final 10 kilometres of the stage, fellow Australian Clarke stopped, took out his wheel and put it in Porte’s bike.

Simon Clarke helps Richie Porte after a flat tyre on stage ten of the 2015 Giro d'Italia

Simon Clarke helps Richie Porte after a flat tyre on stage ten of the 2015 Giro d’Italia

According to UCI Rule 12.1.040, Porte was knocked further back down the overall for accepting the gesture.

The rule, “Non-regulation assistance to a rider of another team”, reads that a rider may be fined and receive a two-minute time penalty and CHF 200 fine for a first offence. The four-person jury applied it to both Porte and Clarke.

uci regs 1

Sky’s sports director, Dario Cioni told reporters outside the pressroom in Forlì: “No comment.”

The UCI jury at the Giro d’Italia met and only said that it would communicate its decision in a press release. Race director, Mauro Vegni told Cycling Weekly that he did not want to comment immediately.

The penalty means Porte lost two minutes and 47 seconds on stage 10.

Porte’s Sky teammates drafted him to the finish, but Porte still came in 47 seconds behind the sprinters’ group with race leader Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo). He slid from third to fourth overall at 1-09 minutes.

The new penalty puts him in 12th overall at 3-09.

>>> Rival Australian comes to Richie Porte’s rescue in Giro d’Italia

“When you have that proof, the photos on the internet and directly on [his] Twitter, it made it evident that something happened that shouldn’t have,” Vegni said later to Cycling Weekly.

“But what credibility can the Giro have if we are to allow something like this? This credibility applies, even if sometimes this hurts someone.”

Vegni said that he understood the kind gesture Clarke was making, but the rules are clear.

“You can’t pass equipment to another team,” Vegni said. “If you know that, then you should not do so for risk of penalty, and in fact the penalty happened.”

Two more stages remain until Saturday’s 59.4-kilometre time trial from Treviso, where Porte could have a chance to gain time on his rivals. Now, however, he appears too far back to think about the pink jersey already on Saturday.

Following the time trial, Porte will be forced to make an aggressive race through the Alps if he wants to win on May 31 in Milan.

  • Paul

    This whole thing could have been handled in one simple way. All 200 riders swap wheels with another team on the next stage, except for Porte and Clarke. They all get hit with a 2 min penalty. It would have been the greatest show of mass sportsmanship EVER. I was hoping I’d pick up the papers the next day and see something along those lines. But no. Apparently the sport of cycling is not quite at that place yet.

    At a minimum, Contador and Aru should have controlled the race until Porte rejoined.

    Paul

  • blemcooper

    Cookson said it himself–a team has 9 riders, not 10.

  • blemcooper

    Somebody did hit it and IIRC broke some bones :-(.

  • Andrew Walsh

    I agree with much of this argument. The word ‘consistency’ is often bandied around as if it is the final answer to the world’s moral dilemmas, which it is not. Many admirable ethical outcomes are mutually exclusive (‘fairness’ and ‘equality’ make for an interesting debate). Oscar Wilde’s provocative aphorism, ‘Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative’ at lest highlights that ‘consistency’ is not always an adequate solution to complex problems. Common sense and discretion – which are important functions of most democratic legal systems – are, in a sport like cycling with all its manifest challenges, far more significant aspects of jury decisions. Compare marathon running, which seems pretty straightforward in terms of ‘rules’ – okay, Pietri was disqualified in the 1908 Olympic marathon for receiving assistance, but this was deserved, if cruel, as he won by assistance, having pretty much collapsed. I still think the Porte penalty was a bad call by the jury. I admire him for taking it so well.

  • Andrew Walsh

    I agree that Cookson should stay out of this. He has made a statement on the incident, which wasn’t necessary, and was a bad call on his part. I don’t envy the man his job, as he is continually walking tightropes, but sometimes saying nothing is the most eloquent statement, and he should have recognised this.

  • Andrew Walsh

    Totally agree. Did Astana or Saxo-Tinkoff complain ? And would they, or would they have just said, ‘Well, he lost nearly a minute and it wasn’t his fault, so that’s that.’ When American doper Hamilton slowed the lead group in the 2003 race so that fellow American Dopestrong could get back on (and then launch an epo fuelled attack) was perceived as an act of ‘sportsmanship’, then this one could surely have also been considered so. Did Orica-GreenEdge take Clarke aside at the end of the stage and read him the riot act for helping Porte – I doubt it. They probably thought it was a decent thing to do in the heat of the moment, which it was. I am becoming increasingly convinced that the Giro jury would love to see Aru atop that podium as the local hero, and Contador should watch out in the time trial just in case he finds a TV helicopter creating an unfavourable headwind.

  • Andrew Walsh

    I am not sure that the sport should be driven by the perceived requirements of the betting industry, but, rather, by notions of fair play and sportsmanship. The betting industry would, in any case, have to abide by the Giro jury’s decision, and there was sufficient ambiguity about the incident to warrant discretion. A professional cyclist’s job is to ride a bike for a trade team, but this does not preclude acts of spontaneous sportsmanship or generosity – I wouldn’t want to follow the sport if it did. Cycling is a sport that contains what seems to outsiders many peculiar practices – I remember there being outrage in some non-cycling quarters when Ullrich, Vinokourov and Kloeden were rumoured to have ‘agreed to work together to stay away’ and secure the medals in the 2000 Olympic road race, but this is how cycling works, which seems very odd to non-cyclists. In this case, giving a wheel to a competitor in distress wasn’t providing Porte with an unfair advantage (as many commentators have pointed out, he could have got a spare wheel from elsewhere), it was a spontaneous act of generosity and sportsmanship and, as such, should not be punished in such a draconian way, a punishment that has, in all probability, taken him out of contention for the overall, which is a shame.

  • Stewart Batch

    Pensioner moment,have corrected it, naughty grammar cheers!

  • Andrew Walsh

    Well, I think that Clarke probably would have given his wheel to anyone who was in Porte’s position, as would many other riders, irrespective of nationality. Clarke clearly wasn’t going to win the stage himself, and wouldn’t mind rolling in a few minutes after the peloton. I think he gave the wheel out of genuine sportsmanship, and I don’t think any of them knew, or recalled, the details of this rule when they were in the position of making very quick decisions. If there had been any cunning involved, then surely Clarke could have given his wheel to another Sky rider, after said Sky rider had given his wheel to Porte, thus enabling as many Sky riders in the chase as possible, but allowing Porte to avoid the penalty. And if a Sky rider had given his wheel to Porte, but Clarke had helped in the chase, would this have been ‘non-regulation assistance’ ? I think not, as it would simply have been an on-road alliance. So I would stand by my evaluation of ‘generous sportsmanship’. In my opinion, the loss of nearly a minute by Porte because of the puncture was bad luck enough; receiving a two minute time penalty is excessive. The other point to consider is whether the Giro jury would have punished Aru had it been him who was the recipient of the wheel – somehow I think they wouldn’t.

  • BikeRideMike

    *.They’re

  • Dabber

    I’d like to see the rules CONSISTENTLY applied. We are told the officials had no option but to apply this rule to Porte. So, apply the relevant rule to Contador for removing his helmet, to Uran for drafting, etc, etc. You either have rules that you have to rigidly apply to everyone or have rules where flexibility and common sense apply – no middle ground. Btw, that should apply to exclusion for those outside of the time limit on every stage and every race no matter the circumstances… that is if you want to destroy the sport.

  • Pete

    if you don’t agree with rules,don’t complain,just do something else!

  • Man in motion

    I beg to disagree. Sportmanship is an act in which a competitor helps another competitor, any. That was argueably not the case, as it is doubtful that Clarke would’ve done the same for Aru or Contador. Barcelona’s Xavi and real Madrid’s Casillas are good friends, but they stop their friendship in the pitch. Knowing you can count on your friend from another team, while your competitors cannot, would be more disresputable to the sport that the rule in question, as in effect it would mean that you could have fifth columns anywhere and overrule the maximum team members restriction. What should Michael Rodgers do? help his team leader Contador, or his fellow Aussie Porte?

  • Man in motion

    Mikel Landa in not Italian.

  • Man in motion

    You say “Generous sportsmanship, when one rider does not want to see a favourite unfairly disadvantaged because of an accident of nature” , but there are two things to be considered for that to be totally waterproof. Would Clarke give his wheel in the same way had the problem happened to Aru or Contador (who also qualify as “favourites”), even if they are not fellow Aussies? If the answer is ‘no’ then I’d say that sellective sportmanship is no sportmanship at all. Second: one can see in the picture that there were other Sky riders watching who could’ve given the wheel to Porte. Why didn’t they? The obvious answer is because that way there would be more of them to try to pull Porte back to the peloton, in escence making Clarke not a good samaritan, but a tenth rider in a team with a restriction of nine.

  • Mike Robertson

    Seems a bit daft bearing in minds teams make deals to work with each other all the time

  • Mike Robertson

    Seems a bit daft bearing in minds teams make deals to work with each other all the time

  • Now what – does Contador go for taking his helmet off while riding. Shouldn’t this be automatic disqualification? If you look on the handlebars in his right hand…

  • Now what – does Contador go for taking his helmet off while riding. Shouldn’t this be automatic disqualification? If you look on the handlebars in his right hand…

  • dave smith

    Maybe from the rule
    2.3.012
    All riders may render each other such minor services as lending or exchanging food, drink, spanners or accessories.

    The lending or exchanging of tubular tyres or bicycles and waiting
    for a rider who has been dropped or involved in an accident shall be
    permitted only amongst riders of the same team. The pushing of one rider
    by another shall in all cases be forbidden, on pain of
    disqualification.

  • dave smith

    Maybe from the rule
    2.3.012
    All riders may render each other such minor services as lending or exchanging food, drink, spanners or accessories.

    The lending or exchanging of tubular tyres or bicycles and waiting
    for a rider who has been dropped or involved in an accident shall be
    permitted only amongst riders of the same team. The pushing of one rider
    by another shall in all cases be forbidden, on pain of
    disqualification.

  • Paul Canham

    Hmm I’ve seen riders behind different team cars slip streaming to the bunch and getting bottles from different team cars! It was good of him to give him a wheel….but…they must have cut a deal you work for me and….£ in it for you.

  • Paul Canham

    Hmm I’ve seen riders behind different team cars slip streaming to the bunch and getting bottles from different team cars! It was good of him to give him a wheel….but…they must have cut a deal you work for me and….£ in it for you.

  • blemcooper

    Yep, people keep bringing up and lumping together things like teams working together to chase breaks, sharing gels/bottles, etc., apparently without realizing that there are specific, distinct regulations for mechanical/breakdown assistance (the case here with Porte & Clarke) vs refreshments supply (the case with Porte & Froome’s illegal feed in 2013 in France) vs team tactics (where riding together faster to chase breaks or drop mutual opponents is fine, but obstructing is not allowed).

  • blemcooper

    It’s a hypothetical, but would Clarke have done the same for Uran, Aru or Contador as others have asked. If so, then I’d see that as unconditional. If not, and he reserves this selflessness to his friends or countrymen, then it’s not unconditional.

  • blemcooper

    It’s not exactly UCI here, but the Giro race jury, who have final say on racing incidents.

  • blemcooper

    Interesting regarding B&W–Dave Brailsford is calling for consistency, common sense and discretion.

    One of those does not belong with the others (i.e. consistency).

    And it’s ironic that he brings up Paris-Roubaix and the TGV crossing, where his team leader Bradley Wiggins was clearly one of the many violators of that safety regulation (along with eventual winner John Degenkolb). I guess to be consistent with that, he would want his leader for the Giro not to get a penalty either. I suppose he could also have wanted Wiggins relegated/disqualified from Paris-Roubaix for that violation for consistency’s sake (as well as common sense if we truly value important safety regulations like not traversing level crossings as the barriers are coming down), but I doubt that.

    EDIT: and to be consistent with what happened in Paris-Roubaix where the commissaires “neutralized” the rule breakers to allow the rule followers to catch up, then the Giro commissaires would have made Porte stop, remove the wheel, have either a team mate give up a wheel or wait for the Sky or Vittoria car (or a spectator!?) to come by with a wheel, AND then wait for Clarke to catch back up to him before crossing the finish line.

  • Well put JMD – my thoughts summarised.

  • Chris

    Yes

  • James Rider

    I assume you are referring to “RT?”

  • Mark Webster

    What about a couple of months ago when UCI allowed riders to race towards bollards in the finishing straight with just a cone on top as a warning, and that spectator grabbing the bars at the end of Molecaten Drentse Acht van Westerveld!

  • Mark Webster

    It does raise the question where was the rest of the team and neutral service. The penalty was given for giving assistance, if I understand the rules correctly: Rival teams working together to keep a breakaway going for the whole day sometimes leading to a stage win is okay, but offering assistance that could save a minute is not okay.

  • Jean M Dean

    The UCI ruling brings the whole of cycling into disrepute. What we saw yesterday a display of unconditional friendship, sportsmanship and camaraderie within the sport of cycling. Something missing from so many sports these days. All the UCI have done is bring cycling into the headline again for all the wrong reasons.

  • markholds

    Interesting to read what non-English (or Italian) speaking commentators are saying. The French newspaper l’Equipe are not so sympathetic. They ask where was his team car and his team-mates, and why didn’t his DS tell him not to accept the wheel? They ask what’s the use of the motor-home and the helicopter transfer when you get a debacle like this?
    They also say that ‘non regulation assistance’ in this rule explicitly mentions not changing bikes or wheels (although I don’t know where they got that from.

  • Chris

    Immature comment!

  • Jon

    That’s the most impressive misspelling of where I’ve ever seen – chapeau!

  • elan

    Would Orica Green Edge have helped Alberto or Aru,i doubt it.There are rules and would there have been the same complaints if it had been Saxo Tinkoff.The penalty is severe,but the rules are there.In formula one if something happens therace is not stopped till a new car is brought in.A 20 second penalty would have been enoughs.Still think its a great race,and porte could still make time up.

  • nortonpdj

    “Non- regualtion assistance” means whatever the commissaires want it to mean….
    Quote from Lewis Carroll’s “Through the Looking Glass” :
    “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.”
    “The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.” “The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master—that’s all.”
    For “Humpty Dumpty” read “UCI race jury”

  • Mr Magoo

    Interesting that the organisers state ” what credibility would the Giro have if they let this go?” , I could see this point of view if they applied the same thought process to the Astana team, numerous doping offenses, managed by a former doper, mind you a chage of wheel is an easier target to deal with!! Until proven otherwise Sky ride clean, and are doing a service to cycling by raising its profile in a positive way, Astana on the other hand……

  • Simon ‘Sprout’ Phillips

    terrible decision, which has ruined the Giro. What is regulation assistance between teams anyway? Surely on the basis of sport and competition there should be no assistance between teams full stop (not necessarily what I believe).
    How can you have teams be allowed to help each other and potentially effect a race in some instances and not in others.
    This should only have been an issue if another team complained, and then it would make that team look like bad sports

  • Stephen Whiteley

    Ha, so the Italian’s are now saying that people’s tripadvisor ratings should determine the outcome of a bike race? Crazeeeee

  • Mister Epic

    UCI hates sportmanship but loves the news when riders are caught doping.

  • David Chadderton

    UCI Rule 12 Discipline and Procedures

    The really annoying part of the (Richie Porte + Simon Clarke) penalty and ruination
    of the Giro efforts put in by both teams is the seemingly inequitable
    application of rule 12 in all cases. I am no lawyer or expert on race
    Commissaries work, and have no intention of ever doing so, but, how many times
    have we seen transgressions’ that go unpunished (rhetorical); lots of times?

    Examples:

    9. Flying relay;

    10.1 Deviating from selected ‘lane’ endangering other riders (in the sprint for the line); how many times do we see this happening either by intention or error in the heat of the moment?

    10.2 Irregular sprint;

    11. Pushing;

    14. Use of sidewalks;

    16. Passing a level crossing which is already down;

    18. Rider holding on to ‘his’ team’s car; (a sexual discrimination law)

    19. Sheltering
    behind or falling into the slip stream of a vehicle;

    37bis. <>

    I have no doubt that Commissaries’ act leniently for everyone’s benefit, but, please apply the rules fairly and equally to all riders, or not at all.

  • reece46

    If Cookson gets involved in this you can imagine the accusations from the anti-Sky hordes, he can’t win on this one. Its Italian Mauro Vegni who made the biased, plain inconsistent, decision. Protecting the good name of the Giro? more like business as usual.

  • nomadtales

    So why didn’t Clarke get penalised for that? Because the UCI makes it up as it goes. It should be black and white. But it’s not.

  • I’d been really enjoying this Giro but this; this is just wrong. Why do I have thoughts about this putting Italians into strong positions in 2nd (potentially 1st) and 3rd. Winner on the day M. Landa, loser = cycling. There has been a lot of sporting behaviour on this Giro (good to see) passing gels, bottles… Not punished. Good. There have been zillions of sticky bottle cases… Not punished. Good. Rules may be rules but the UCI chooses when to apply them and who to and that just isn’t sport. Frankly it isn’t even entertainment. Cookson – get busy and sort this ameteur organisation out before the last remnants of cycling as a road sport are lost for a generation.

  • blemcooper

    Another interesting thing here is that many folks, Dave Brailsford in particular, have referred to the spirit of the regulations vs the letter (which has been applied here).

    What exactly is the “spirit” of the regulation about non-regulation assistance of a rider of another team?

    We’ve been wondering exactly what a non-regulation assist is, and rightly so since it’s unclear what constitutes non-regulation assistance (or perhaps what counts as regulation assistance).

    Well, there are explicit regulations against giving other riders (even on your own team!) a helpful push, with a penalty of 10 seconds for the pushing rider regardless of the teams involved and also a 10 second penalty for the pushed rider if it is among teammates. Arguably, if the helped rider is on a different team, then the helped rider is innocent. But then there’s a regulation against pushing off another rider, regardless of team that yields a 10 second penalty as well. Arguably, there is no difference in effect of pushing off a willing pushee and being pushed by a cooperating pusher. Being pushed by a spectator also yields a penalty, albeit just money, not time.

    So if there is a spirit of the ambiguous regulations about physical assistance of riders at play here, at the very least it is clear that the helping rider is in the wrong in spirit, and arguable that the helped rider is also in the wrong (even if innocent, e.g. with an unsolicited spectator push).

    We lay people want easy to understand, explicit rules about stuff. But that’s now how laws/regulations get written, partly because they cannot list every possible thing that is in or out of compliance. So they write generalized rules that you have to apply to any situations that come up and maybe the spirit of the law helps figure out what it means.

    In this case, the spirit goes against Brailsford’s understanding of the regulation. I imagine his view of the spirit is about being gentleman, kumbaya, friendship, patriotism.

  • blemcooper

    For racing incidents like this, the race officials make the final call. There is no appeal process in the regulations. They can certainly try though.

  • cahern1968

    Flashback 28 years to 1987, Robert Millar gave Stephen Roche a great deal of help and no time penalties or fines were handed out.

  • blemcooper

    Those have happened, e.g. to Levi Leipheimer in the 2007 TdF (albeit a 10 second penalty–I don’t know if the 2 minute penalty is new since then) for excessive team car powered saddle adjustment after a mechanical.

  • reece46

    The difference is Astana didn’t disrespect local hotels. Get your priorities right when in Italy.

  • reece46

    They know the rules? so you will be calling for a 2 minute penalty on a sticky bottle or pacing behind a team car following a mechanical? This just opens up a can of worms the next time any of these happen, which will be tomorrow. It’s nothing more than Italian BS politics.

  • Stephen Whiteley

    So the UCI can’t revoke the licence of Astana for unsportsmanlike behaviour but can so easily wreck a grand tour due to sportsmanlike behaviour and so the whole cycling fiasco continues

  • blemcooper

    Sadly, while helping your fellow racer like this would seem obviously like a good, sporting thing to do, it may well be that legalized betting and laws on sporting fraud require discouraging/penalizing the offering of undue assistance to competitors, even if well-intentioned and innocent. After all, interests who bet on Simon Clarke or Orica-GreenEdge doing their best in the Giro (or bet on Porte and Sky not winning) would feel cheated by what Clarke did to help Porte/Sky. That’s not his job, his job is to help Orica-GreenEdge.

  • Stewart Batch

    Can Sky and Orica appeal?

  • blemcooper

    Maybe. See my reply to James Rider above.

  • Andrew Walsh

    Totally agree. What is the definition of ‘non-regulation assistance’ and how does it compare with an act of generous sportsmanship, when one rider does not want to see a favourite unfairly disadvantaged because of an accident of nature (a puncture) ? What does ‘Each rider concerned’ mean ? Surely the rider providing the assistance is punishable, as the perpetrator, but isn’t ‘Each rider concerned’ a bit ambiguous and can simply mean each rider guilty of the offence as stated of assisting anohter rider: the beneficiary of such assistance is not clearly defined as guilty (the offence being an active one of providing assistance to another). Did Porte commit this offence – of providing assistance to another rider ?

  • blemcooper

    Refreshments have separate regulations from breakdown assistance.

    And it depends on whether it was in the first 50K (200 francs) or the final 50K (200 francs and 20 seconds, which is what happened to Porte and Froome for their illegal late feed at the 2013 TdF where Froome avoided bonking before a final climb) or in between (no penalties).

    Clarke actually could have been docked additional time and fined more money for also giving Porte a push after giving him his wheel.

  • Steve T

    So the video evidence of all the riders passing over gels and receiving bottles from other team cars now need to be scrutinized, and retrospective time penalties issued to all the recipients.

  • James Rider

    Grow up.

  • RT

    You will be sorely missed, no doubt.

  • James Cooper

    I think Simon Clarke’s help was great sportsmanship. This was not a particularly critical point in a three week race – much greater battles are ahead where such help could be decisive.

    While rules might be rules – surely there is room for interpretation? Why rub salt into a wound when due to no fault of his own Richie Porte had already lost nearly a minute?

    It reminds me of the 1978 Giro when Roger De Vlaeminck (Sanson) helped the leader Johan De Muynck (Bianchi-Faema) after they both fell. I do not recall penalties being imposed then.

  • Stewart Batch

    With seconds to make a decision, sometimes we all make wrong calls. With radio communication to the team car the DS should be the cool head, seems not in this case! The DS must take some responsibility for the error!

  • Andrew Walsh

    Without a doubt the race authorities would have exercised discretion if Porte had been called Portolina and been Italian. Reminds you of the days that Moser received helicopter air assistance on a flattish Giro, and then the Giro suddenly became very pointy when Pantani appeared on the scene. Roche had to race and defy his own (Italian) team to win the Giro. A shame as it’s such a great route, but in Italy rules are always for the ‘other’ person, and can be largely ignored by Italians. You only have to drive there to recognise this attitude.

  • James Rider

    I think I saw a BMC rider hand a gel to another team the other day. Were they docked?

  • Sander van Delden

    It’s in the rules, so the Giro can’t do much else then to follow the rules. Nevertheless the Giro would have lost one of their favourites if it wasn’t for Clarke to help Porte out.

  • blemcooper

    I’m more worried about the UCI allowing vertical barriers in sprint finishes that allow a spectator to lean out into the course and knock down racers sprinting at 65+ kph! They need to require the slanted barriers that at least push the spectators a foot or two back from the course.

  • blemcooper

    If one of the Sky riders gave him their wheel, that’d be one less rider to try to TTT him back to the peloton, so not having the rules in mind, it was to their advantage (or so they might have thought) to let Clarke give up his wheel.

    Good question though about where the Sky car or Vittoria neutral support were.

  • skelto99

    Totally agree. Cookson needs to get this sorted quickly out if the UCI are going to promote watching elite cycling to the masses. It makes the sport a laughing stock. They must remember that like any other professional sport, pro cycling is ONLY entertainment.

  • Stewart Batch

    Their Pros they know the rules, we’re was the team car? Also his team mates stood and watched, why didn’t they give him a wheel? Giro ruined for team Sky and the viewers, just like last years Tour “a one horse race” or to some a damp squid!

  • James Rider

    Utterly, utterly ridiculous. How can anyone possibly let this stand? A two minute penalty for accepting a wheel? That’s the Giro ruined for me. Goodbye.

  • Dabber

    Time to go home Richie and give this crock of sh*t a miss.
    No point watching anymore either.

  • skelto99

    That’s the Giro over as a spectator event then. RP might as well go home and prepare for the TdeF. It wouldn’t be the first time a rider has given up when they find they’ve no chance of winning a Grand Tour would it?