Ten Brits started the Tour de France in Utrecht on July 4, with eight reaching Paris on stage 21 - how did they all fare?

Chris Froome

Chris Froome on stage twenty-one of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Chris Froome on stage twenty-one of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

It went pretty well for the Team Sky leader, didn’t it? Froome took the yellow jersey as early as the third stage, lost it on stage four, got it back by default after stage six and never let it go again.

His win on the Col du Soudet on stage 10 was Froome’s high point of the race before he turned offence into defence and limited his losses over the final few stages in the Alps.

Froome’s second Tour win is arguably a greater achievement than his first, given the lack of time trials, the high number of mountains and the quality of his rivals.

Just like in 2013, Froome couldn’t dodge the relentless doping allegations and the hostility of the fans, but made it to the finish physically unscathed. Now he may tackle the Vuelta a España in September in an attempt to complete a fabled double.

Geraint Thomas

Geraint Thomas put in the most impressive ride of his life in this year's Tour (Sunada)

Geraint Thomas put in the most impressive ride of his life in this year’s Tour (Sunada)

Up until stage 19, Geraint Thomas was on course for a top-five finish in the Tour, but the parcours of the second day in the Alps proved too much for the battling Welshman who lost 22 minutes on his rivals.

Thomas was the ultimate domestique for virtually all of the three week race, guiding Froome through the winds and rain of stage two, over the cobbles on stage four and into the first mountain stages in the Pyrenees.

The benefit of supporting a GC contender is that you can also get a decent position yourself if you can cling on when others attack. That’s what Thomas did until the first ascent of the Col de la Croix de Fer on Friday.

In the end he finished 15th overall but won a lot of fans across the world and proved himself capable of leading a team at a Grand Tour.

Luke Rowe

Luke Rowe on stage seventeen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Luke Rowe on stage seventeen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Like a true domestique, Luke Rowe never broke the top 50 in any of the stages (except the TTT) but was one of Froome’s trusted allies in the first week. With the opening eight stages suiting Rowe’s riding style and characteristics it was no surprise to see him taking on a senior role in the team in marshalling Froome towards the mountains in one piece.

Once they reached the Pyrenees, Rowe’s job wasn’t done, as he helped to pace Froome until the final climbs before dropping back to save energy for the next day.

In his first Tour de France, Rowe rarely looked out of his depth, never looked a liability and gained valuable experience for what will surely be plenty more Tours to come.

Ian Stannard

Ian Stannard and Tony Martin escape on stage two of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Ian Stannard and Tony Martin escape on stage two of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Like Rowe, Stannard didn’t strive for personal glory over the three weeks – his best result coming in stage two when he battled through the wind and rain to keep Froome in contention on the vital stage.

He did everything that was expected of him – providing a diesel engine to power the peloton for long stretches on varied terrain and getting Froome to the line safely.

Peter Kennaugh

Peter Kennaugh on stage sixteen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Peter Kennaugh on stage sixteen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Kennaugh said before the Tour that the best thing about wearing the national champion’s jersey is the fact that you can’t hide in the peloton. Unfortunately for the Manxman an illness scuppered his Tour and it was clear to see when he was struggling.

The 26-year-old abandoned the Tour after stage 15 having struggled for form and fitness in the preceding stages, leaving Froome a man down for the Alpine stages.

Mark Cavendish

Mark Cavendish wins stage seven of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Mark Cavendish wins stage seven of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Another Manxman to be struck down with illness, Cavendish saw himself regularly beaten by Andre Greipel over the three weeks, but his struggle on stage 15 was unfortunately his defining moment.

Having been there-and-thereabouts in the first two sprint stages – both won by Greipel – Cav bounced back to win stage seven. But having had to wait until late in the second week for another chance at a sprint, the Etixx-Quick-Step man found himself off the back early after reportedly suffering from illness in the days before.

He then lost his leadout man Mark Renshaw in the Alps, and with two other members of his team also out of the race his leadout train for Paris was depleted. Cavendish acknowledged Greipel’s dominance in the Tour after the Paris sprint and insisted he’ll be back to add to his 26 stages next year.

Steve Cummings

Steven Cummings wins stage fourteen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Steven Cummings wins stage fourteen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

As a Brit, one of the most memorable moments of the Tour came on stage 14 when Steve Cummings stole past home favourites Thibaut Pinot and Romain Bardet on the run in to the Mende airstrip to win on Mandela Day.

Riding for MTN-Qhubeka not much was expected from the chap from Merseyside but he excelled with a 10th-place finish on the opening time trial and then got in the right break to win the historic stage.

Alex Dowsett

Alex Dowsett on stage five of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Alex Dowsett on stage five of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

The dream of riding in the Tour de France soon turned into a nightmare for Dowsett, crashing on stage four and requiring six stitches to quell the bleeding from his elbow.

From then on the whole race was a struggle for the former Hour Record holder, struggling to finish stage five before almost capitulating in the Pyrenees.

Dowsett just made it home inside the time cut on stage 11 over the Col du Tourmalet but then struggled from the off in stage 12 and reluctantly climbed into the team car before the halfway point in the race.

Adam Yates

Adam Yates on stage eighteen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Adam Yates on stage eighteen of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

His first Tour de France was nothing but a success for Adam Yates. Time after time the 22-year-old performed at a level well beyond his years, claiming three top-10 finishes, getting into breakaways and all in a team crippled by injuries.

Orica-GreenEdge lost three riders in the first week and Michael Matthews rode on with broken ribs. If anything this gave Adam more of a free rein to attack on the climbs and get into positions to maybe challenge for the win.

His defining moment came on stage seven when he out-climbed the likes of Vincenzo Nibali and Alberto Contador to finish seventh on the stage. Tenth on the stage to Pra Loup was equally impressive, as was his ride on stage 20, losing only 4:27 on Alpe d’Huez.

Give him a few years and Adam Yates may rank among the best climbers in the pro peloton.

Simon Yates

Simon Yates on stage twenty of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Simon Yates on stage twenty of the 2015 Tour de France (Watson)

Like his brother, Simon Yates was often given license to get out in the break and challenge for stage wins but his best Tour moment had to wait until Alpe d’Huez, where he climbed to 11th place.

An illness in the second week held him back somewhat, but he proved just what a talent he is on stage three up the Mur de Huy, finishing eighth ahead of Nairo Quintana and Alberto Contador.

Both brothers made it to Paris and for Simon it was the first Grand Tour he’s completed, having abandoned the Tour early last year.

This double act is one we’ll see for years to come.

 Watch the best bits of the 2015 Tour de France