Etixx-QuickStep pro Niki Terpstra posts Monday evening's bus transfer data on Strava, and takes a load of KOMs along the way

Dutch pro Niki Terpstra has posted up his Etixx-QuickStep team’s Vuelta a España bus transfer on Strava, which took place on Monday evening ahead of the race’s first rest day on Tuesday.

The 434-kilometre (269.6-mile) journey from Castellón de la Plana took over five hours to complete, starting after the finish of stage 10. The team bus climbed a total of 3780 metres (12,402 feet) on its way to Andorra as the race heads into the high mountains.

Along the way, Terpstra and his bus ‘took’ 13 Strava King of the Mountains titles – leading to the ‘ride’ being flagged by another user. Terpstra said that he’d delete the data and he’d only posted up to give fans an insight into the transfer.

“It’s just to show you guys how our Vuelta is. Don’t worry for the people who have KOMs on the highway, I will delete this ride later,” the 2014 Paris-Roubaix winner and current Dutch national champion said on Strava. He won’t miss the KOMs from his account, as he has claimed over 1000 since December 2011.

>>> The nine best tweets from the first Vuelta a España rest day

German former pro rider Marcel Wüst commented: “Not a real rest day ;-( Have a good recovery anyway, guys!”

The bus averaged 86.3kmh (53.6mph) on its journey, with a maximum of 116.7kmh (72.5mph). Terpstra’s Garmin Edge 500 recorded the temperature as 29°C – we’re hoping that wasn’t the internal temperature of the team bus.

Terpstra has also posted up all of his genuine rides from the Vuelta.

Niki Terpstra's Strava file for the Vuelta a Espana bus transfer

Niki Terpstra’s Strava file for the Vuelta a Espana bus transfer

Terpstra currently sits in 102nd place in the Vuelta’s general classification, one hour and 12 minutes behind leader Tom Dumoulin (Giant-Alpecin).

After the rest day in Andorra, the riders face a tough day of climbing and descending on stage 11’s 138km course on Wednesday that features six categorised climbs, including up to the mountain-top finish at Els Cortals de Encamp. The race concludes on September 13.

  • RobTM

    Some do, I was very skeptical at first; but I found Strava quite motivating and not for the KoM bragging, like any tool it can be used well or badly

  • Crydda

    Fair enough, if that’s all you want, but my point was 9maybe rather poorly made) that all this technology can (and definitely does in some cases) deflect people from the reasons they first got into cycling; namely just the joy of riding for its own sake.

  • Crydda

    Fair enough, if that’s all you want, but my point was 9maybe rather poorly made) that all this technology can (and definitely does in some cases) deflect people from the reasons they first got into cycling; namely just the joy of riding for its own sake.

  • Anthony Jackson

    Its a fair point, I ride with a power meter and I use software to analyse my fitness and form. Strava is only a bit of fun and I have used it in the past to help me see if I am fitter than I was ‘before’. Although I dont resist strava, I do resist the temptation to ruin a nice ride because I know there is a segment up the road…. thats insanity. Alot of riders, ride because they want to be fitter or lighter and I find a power meter is a good way to measure that info…and strava just gives me some times up a local hill which I can compare to previous hard efforts. I think those of us who race need to ‘train’, but please, believe it or not it is possible to be riding to a Zone on my power meter AND have a great feeling of happiness and relaxation.

  • Anthony Jackson

    Its a fair point, I ride with a power meter and I use software to analyse my fitness and form. Strava is only a bit of fun and I have used it in the past to help me see if I am fitter than I was ‘before’. Although I dont resist strava, I do resist the temptation to ruin a nice ride because I know there is a segment up the road…. thats insanity. Alot of riders, ride because they want to be fitter or lighter and I find a power meter is a good way to measure that info…and strava just gives me some times up a local hill which I can compare to previous hard efforts. I think those of us who race need to ‘train’, but please, believe it or not it is possible to be riding to a Zone on my power meter AND have a great feeling of happiness and relaxation.

  • RobTM

    Well you don’t have to compete in Strava, it collates the rides you do, that you upload; no need to worry what other ppl do

  • RobTM

    Well you don’t have to compete in Strava, it collates the rides you do, that you upload; no need to worry what other ppl do

  • Crydda

    Well done Nikki; it shows a sense of humour and the entry was marked “transfer bus”, after all. Personally, I’ve always resisted Strava – when I cycle, I do it for the enjoyment as well as the exercise and I’m not interested in competing with people twenty or thirty years younger than me, who may or may not be cheating anyway. I only compete with myself.
    I’m often surprised at the competitive zealousness of some cyclists, who ride with a sense of entitlement, barely disguised anger and always seem highly stressed and yet clearly are never going to be mistaken for Cavandish or Contador, but I guess if Strava contributes to their improved fitness and sense of well-being, then fair enough, but I often feel that these folks, with all the kit, including power metres, are really missing out on what for me, is cyclings biggest attractions – simply enjoying barrelling along, the breeze in your face, the sun on your back (if you’re lucky, but who cares if it rains) taking in the sounds and sights, relishing the freedom of the open road, embracing the challenges you encounter and meeting and possibly riding a few kms with fellow riders.
    For me, a successful ride, is returning home tired, relaxed and with a feeling of having achieved something – I don’t need Strava for that.

  • Crydda

    Well done Nikki; it shows a sense of humour and the entry was marked “transfer bus”, after all. Personally, I’ve always resisted Strava – when I cycle, I do it for the enjoyment as well as the exercise and I’m not interested in competing with people twenty or thirty years younger than me, who may or may not be cheating anyway. I only compete with myself.
    I’m often surprised at the competitive zealousness of some cyclists, who ride with a sense of entitlement, barely disguised anger and always seem highly stressed and yet clearly are never going to be mistaken for Cavandish or Contador, but I guess if Strava contributes to their improved fitness and sense of well-being, then fair enough, but I often feel that these folks, with all the kit, including power metres, are really missing out on what for me, is cyclings biggest attractions – simply enjoying barrelling along, the breeze in your face, the sun on your back (if you’re lucky, but who cares if it rains) taking in the sounds and sights, relishing the freedom of the open road, embracing the challenges you encounter and meeting and possibly riding a few kms with fellow riders.
    For me, a successful ride, is returning home tired, relaxed and with a feeling of having achieved something – I don’t need Strava for that.

  • FPCyclist

    Wonder how many other Strava posts are actually bus rides? Some of the stuff posted out there strains credibility. Well done Niki. I got a kick out of this item!

  • Bob Smith

    is this newsworthy??