Here's what the man himself and others had to say on social media following an incident in which Peter Sagan was knocked off by a support motorbike in the Vuelta a España

During stage eight of the 2015 Vuelta a España, the biggest talking point from the race was an incident in which Peter Sagan was knocked off his bike by a support motorbike.

What’s more, it was a stage he could plausibly have won and he was later forced to withdraw from the race entirely as a result of his injuries.

As is the way these days, people took to social media to voice their concern for the rider, their dismay at the fact he was fined for his reaction and in one case some conspiracy theories on the whole sorry affair.

The man himself was relatively restrained in his calls for reforms as a result of the incident. This isn’t the first time a race vehicle has stolen the headlines this season.

Sagan’s Tinkoff-Saxo team confirmed the news that a race motorbike was to blame for the incident, something that wasn’t entirely clear at first due to a lack of footage.

The day after the incident, once the Slovak had been forced to leave the Vuelta, he posted a statement from his team espressing their dissatisfaction about the forced withdrawal of their co-leader.

Something a bit lighter from elsewhere in the twittersphere…

Never shy to say what he thinks, team owner Oleg Tinkov make his feelings clear in no uncertain terms.

He then left it a couple of hours before voicing a bit of a conspiracy theory on what he thinks could have been a wider plot against his team and its star riders.

ITV’s Ned Boulting gave us all a bit of perspective on the strange world of the UCI‘s fines and punishments. Some topical examples from this year’s Vuelta that highlight the seemingly unconnected nature of infringement to financial penalty.

Boulting’s Vuelta highlights co-presenter and ex-pro David Millar had a better idea for the moto driver after their expulsion from the rest of the race.

GCN’s man in America Neal Rogers articulately described what a number of us were thinking when news came through that Sagan had been penalised for his reaction to being toppled off and injured.

Let us know if we’ve missed any insightful or amusing tweets about Sagan’s moto incident in the comments below.

  • emilram

    As for Sergio Paolinio, the video clearly shows Sergio sliding into the moto.

  • emilram

    Like most of us cyclists watching the races ,almost every stage and sometimes watching specific stage again in order to refresh our memory, cannot be fooled so easily .
    .And so, to blame a skilled moto in service of a grand tour ,to me , it’s like a joke.

  • Boops

    That is true

  • Jacek Kapela

    Sponsors or team owners invest a lot of money in training and racing. How would you feel if your investment is ruined by idiots who are not able to to their job (drive the bloody motorcycle) properly and safely? Oleg Tinkov is 100% right. And what Spanish organisers did this year, doing team time trial on a sand is unbelivable. What will be next? Team trial on ice skating track? Cycling is tough and dangerous sport. Let’s respect the riders, their health and their job. If UCI fines Sagan instead of organizers it means they are idiots and should be replaced ASAP.

  • Ken

    I agree that we would all feel aggrieved at what happened if we were Peter Sagan (I wish!). But helashed out at the wrong moto and the doc’s car!
    At the end of the day he is a professional and has to behave like one.
    We all get p*&&ed off watching primadona footballers who lose their cool and act like spoiled brats. We must be careful that our own heroes don’t drift into the same territory by accepting unruly behaviour in the light of, admittedly extreme, misadventures.

  • Ken

    There are all the things we see like highlighting hazards, central reservations and the like.
    Believe me, I know, it’s a real logistical challenge to ensure there are enough mobile resources to deal with problems that crop up unexpectedly.
    On the other hand having been to a number of high profile races there are also a large number of what seem to be ‘hangers on’ that join the circus, though not necessarilyon motorbikes.

  • J1

    They still have to control things even on full course closures, the general public are idiots. I’ve seen cars getting through a junction or out of a driveway and then heading down the road towards the riders before now.

  • J1

    They still have to control things even on full course closures, the general public are idiots. I’ve seen cars getting through a junction or out of a driveway and then heading down the road towards the riders before now.

  • Nicholas Barton

    On grand tours like the vuelta. Roads are normally closed throughout the stage. In some cases rolling road closures are used like described.

  • Nicholas Barton

    On grand tours like the vuelta. Roads are normally closed throughout the stage. In some cases rolling road closures are used like described.

  • Ken

    there has to be a large number of motor bikes to control traffic infront of the race. Think about it….bike goes ahead and controls a junction, race goes past, motor bike rides through the race to its next junction. Multiply that by several to cover all the junctions, crossings, crowds etc and you’ve got a lot of bikes. Inevitable I’m afraid for a big race like the vuelta.
    They’ve just got to be switched on and good at what they do.

  • Aardeegeedubya

    It would be very dull coverage if only filmed from choppers & fixed cameras. How else can see the pain on the riders faces as the gradients increase if not filmed from the back of a moto. Nobody is calling to chuck out the baby with the bathwater, cycle races need a convoy of motorbikes, cars, vans, ambulances etc. to make them happen & the racing occurs in an amongst all this vehicular traffic.
    The argument is about the parameters of the way the motos/cars interact with the riders (who can forget the horrific 2011Hoogerland/Flecha accident, incidentally filmed by a moto)
    They are there to film or provide support to the racers & for the most part this occurs without issue, it is only when they influence the results that they are a problem.

  • JC526

    We can watch from above, we have had cameras that could read a license plate from 17 miles above the planet – we can put a decent lens on a helicopter and cameras on the course. Stop endangering the riders!
    Damn – this isn’t NASCAR!

  • Aardeegeedubya

    who would film the proceedings for us to watch?

  • JC526

    Sagan and company had every right to react to the moto bad behavior – I wish they would keep the motos off the course and let them ride unmolested.

  • blemcooper

    I know this (and another earlier this year) were neutral service vehicles and not camera bikes, but if there are too many camera motos zipping around, doing things more dangerously than in previous years, I wonder if it’s because they fear being replaced by on-bike cameras and “drones” in the coming years, so they try to get ever more interesting, closer shots to prove their worth. But if camera motos get too involved in the race outcomes, that may end up speeding up their decline.

  • Jon Sparks

    Two thoughts
    1: Oleg Tinkoff is a nutcase
    2: UCI really needs to get its act together on this and other fronts. There needs to be tighter regulation of cars and motos on all races. We also had Dumoulin yesterday getting angry with a TV moto because it was too close to a rider and effectively giving him a tow. We all want good TV pictures but not at the expense of the racing or the riders.

  • Bob

    Apart from the cameras on the motorbikes, i’ve always wondered why you need so may of them speeding past the peloton every few minutes. Id expect some in front of the race, some behind and some alongside, but having so many is just an accident waiting to happen and I’m surprised there aren’t more incidents.