A strong core is a fundamental part of bike riding. We spend hours upon hours on the saddle, and while it is our lower body pushing the power through the pedals, it is our core that keeps the body stable.

But the core doesn’t just comprise of the muscles in and around the torso. There are many more. The gluteal and quadriceps are just two of examples of muscles that also form part of the core fraternity, which often get ignored.

In fact, all muscles are interconnected, and if one muscle in the chain isn’t able to cope with the pressures placed upon it, others will naturally try and compensate. Once you can no longer compensate or adapt, pain and injury will occur, affecting your bike position, performance and even safety.

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For example, a weak set of lower back muscles will have a significant impact on stability. A body that is unable to keep steady on the bike will result in excessive side-to-side movement, causing tension in your back, possibly resulting in injury and an unstable platform for your legs and hips to fire from.

If your flexibility is poor as a result of weak, badly maintained core muscles, you may find you are restricted when attempting to control the bike. If you can’t comfortably reach the hoods or drops and be able to apply the brakes or even shift gears, it could be potentially dangerous.

Don’t ignore your core. A strong core will limit the adjustments your body has to make.
Our quick-fire core routine workout doesn’t require a gym membership and won’t take much time out of your day. Try this three times a week on your less intense training days.