Tinkoff‘s chief mechanic Christophe Desimpelaere spoke to us ahead of Paris-Roubaix to explain the technical details of Peter Sagan‘s bike for the Hell of the North.

Desimpelaere has been with the team since its founding in 1998 and is the longest serving member. Not only that, his grandfather Maurice Desimpelaere won Paris-Roubaix in 1944!

Peter Sagan's custom Prologo Saddle

Peter Sagan’s custom Prologo Saddle

Rather than ride his favoured Tarmac, the bike which he rode to victory in the World Championships and Tour of Flanders, Sagan opted for the Specialized S-Works Roubaix to tackle the cobbles.

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Desimpelaere told us that the Roubaix has greater tyre clearance allowing Sagan to run 30mm tyres.

Vibration dampening Zertz, Roval 40mm wheels with FMB 30 custom tubular tyres. Note the Cermaic Speed bearings.

Vibration dampening Zertz, Roval 40mm wheels with FMB 30 custom tubular tyres. Note the Cermaic Speed bearings.

In addition the Roubaix has a longer wheelbase for greater stability on the cobbles and special inserts to dampen vibration.

Crucially though the stack and reach geometry is the same on both the Tarmac and Roubaix allowing Sagan to achieve the same position on both bikes.

SRM power meter, 11-25t cassette and 53/44t chain rings.

SRM power meter, 11-25t cassette and 53/44t chain rings.

Sagan’s bike has many details befitting his status as World Champion. The saddle features custom graphics, the pedals too.

FSA bars and seat post also feature custom graphics, as do the Roval 40mm wheels, which have rainbow stripe decals.

>>> Tom Boonen’s Specialized S-Works Roubaix SL4 (Video)

Although many riders, including Tom Boonen, choose to double wrap their bar tape, Peter Sagan has opted for just a single layer of SupaCaz tape.

Sagan had just a single layer of bar tape and a single climbing shifter

Sagan had just a single layer of bar tape and a single climbing shifter

The groupset is naturally full Shimano Dura Ace, but interestingly Sagan has opted for mechanical and not Di2. This is because he suffered a Di2 related mechanical at a crucial moment in last year’s race and would rather use mechanical shifting in Paris-Roubaix.

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Power measurement is via an SRM on the 53t/44t chainset. The larger inner ring is used because Roubaix is flat and a 39t ring is too light a gear for powerful pros like Sagan.

The front fork mounted sensor is required for speed measurement and looks fairly antiquated on such a sophisticated bike.

Sagan's bike has board tape on the bottle cages to help better secure the bottles.

Sagan’s bike has board tape on the bottle cages to help better secure the bottles

Tyres are 30mm FMB tubulars, that have been modified with a Specialized Turbo tread. This tread offers lower rolling resistance than the standard FMB tread and the inner tubes are latex.

Desimpelaere explained that some mechanics inject sealant into the tubular tyres for added puncture protection, but the use of latex inner tubes prevented them doing it.

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This is because the latex inner tube offers lower rolling resistance, but reacts with the sealant. It’s not just Team Sky who look for marginal gains.

Tinkoff are using Ceramic Speed bearings throughout the bike in a bid to make drive trains more efficient and save precious watts.

Tinkoff bikes were also fitted with Ceramic Speed jockey wheels #marginalgains.

Tinkoff bikes were also fitted with Ceramic Speed jockey wheels