Here we have LottoNL-Jumbo rider Steven Kruijswijk’s stunning Bianchi Oltre XR4, resplendent in that classic celeste colourway that Bianchi is so well known for.

The Oltre XR4 is Bianchi’s dedicated aero bike offering, featuring an integrated fork and head tube.

Non integrated bar and stem of the Bianchi XR4

Kruijswijk isn’t using an integrated bar and stem

Unlike other aero offerings such as the Specialized Venge ViAS or the Trek Madone, the stem and bars on the Oltre XR4 are separate units. While this won’t aid their stiffness, it will make it easier for the mechanics to work on.

Kruijswijk is running Shimano’s new Dura-Ace R9150 Di2, smuggling the junction box underneath the stem and bars.

Shimano's Dura-Ace C50 wheels

Steven Kruijswijk uses Shimano’s old Dura-Ace C50 wheels

Sitting beside that is Shimano’s dedicated climbing shifters, which should make going up the steep stuff more comfortable, as Kruijswijk won’t have to move from his preferred climbing position of on the tops.

Interestingly, Kruijswijk isn’t using Shimano’s most up-to-date Dura-Ace wheels, instead running their older C50 models. We’ll assume this is due to the supply of the new model. That said, they still have deep sections, meaning they’ll contribute to the bike’s overall aero and stiffness prowess nicely.

>>> Bianchi announces prices for its new Oltre XR3 aero bike

New Dura-Ace Di2 including a Pioneer power meter

New Dura-Ace Di2 including a Pioneer power meter

Jammed in the middle of the Dura-Ace chainrings is Kruijswijk’s Pioneer power meter, providing the Dutch rider with all his important race stats.

The ride comes with all the neat carbon trimmings you’d expect. Selle San Marco take care of the saddle with their Aspide model – a hand made carbon racing saddle, one of the lightest on the market.

Elsehwhere, Tacx provide carbon bottle cages and the top tube is adorned with six lotto balls.