Show us your scars #41: Chad Haga (video)

The Giant-Alpecin rider is still recovering from a major crash at a training camp in January
Playlist 19 Videos Show us your scars #41: Chad Haga (video) 01:12 Watch: Tom Dumoulin relives his emotional final day Giro d'Italia victory 08:20 A day in the life of a Giant-Alpecin rider (video) 01:34 Secrets of the toolbox: Giant-Alpecin (video) 02:38 Watch: Taking on the toughest climbs of the Tour of Flanders 13:52 The Lead Out: April 2019 - Cobbled Classics preview 36:50 The Lead Out: March 2019 - Milan-San Remo preview 34:48 Watch: Tour of Oman 2019 stage two highlights 06:33 Watch: Tour Down Under 2019 stage six highlights 05:38 Watch: Tour Down Under 2019 stage five highlights 00:00 Watch: Tour Down Under 2019 stage two highlights 05:23 Watch: Tour Down Under 2019 stage one highlights 04:49 The Lead Out: January 2019 - Tour Down Under and season preview 25:30 Watch: The best bits of the 2018 Tour de France 07:54 Watch: Tour de France 2018 stage 21 highlights 03:53 Watch: 2018 Tour de France stage 20 highlights 04:18 Watch: 2018 Tour de France stage 19 highlights 05:17 Watch: Tour de France 2018 stage 18 highlights 03:56 Watch: Tour de France 2018 stage 17 highlights 04:48

For many riders who appear in our ‘show us your scars’ series most of their injuries come as the result of crashes in the bunch or on wayward descents.

However, for Chad Haga and some of his Giant-Alpecin teammates – including John Degenkold who almost lost a finger, their injuries were the result of an incident with a car travelling on the wrong side of the road.

A 73-year-old British woman has been charged with reckless driving after the crash in Spain.

Injury photos courtesy of Chad Haga/Instagram

Photographs from the scene of the broken bikes gave some incidation of how bad the collision had been, but it’s images like the ones Haga shared on his on social media that really show the extent of his injuries.

Most shocking of all was the 27-year-old’s realisation as to why there had been a gap over his throat in the line of 96 stitches: his helmet strap may well have saved his life.

Now racing at the Giro d’Italia, the American says that he isn’t fully recovered but a positive outlook and an ability to make light of such a traumatic time are helping him get back to his best.

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