With the clocks going back, now is the time where you may think twice about your commute to and from work.

Longer, darker nights and harsher weather, it might not seem the ideal time to be out riding your bike. However, with a little help from British Cycling, they believe you can keep on riding relatively worry free and most of all, still be able to enjoy it.

Help for all
British Cycling are here to help. Not only do they want you riding your bikes, they want you to be safe whilst doing it. Their Ride membership, aimed at the recreational cyclist, provides a whole host of benefits to get the most out of your commute.

How British Cycling supports commuters
Here are some of the ways British Cycling supports all its members.

Campaigning
At British Cycling, their aim is to represent the views of all its members. With road safety a concern, British Cycling is actively lobbying in Westminster and to support their campaigning they are running a survey on road safety to understand which issues members are most concerned about.

Skills and techniques to be more confident
British Cycling provides their members with a complete breakdown of riding skills and techniques from the best in the business. From emergency stops to balance and steering and primary road positions, their expert advice will keep you on the road throughout all seasons.

Advice and tips from experienced commuters
All members receive weekly advice from the British Cycling experts that will help you carry on riding whatever the weather. From the best way to lube your bike chain to fixing a puncture, British Cycling can keep you on your bike.

Membership
For just £24 a year British Cycling memberships include liability insurance to allow you to continue your commute with confidence.

Look good and ride safe
As you all know, cycling clothes aren’t cheap, however, all Ride members receive discounts at Wiggle and Halfords allowing you to get the best commuting kit cheaper. 

Riding skills and techniques
Balance & steering: Five things to remember
1. Relax the upper body, look ahead, not at your front wheel
2. Turn the bike using a combination of hips, hands and head
3. Point your head where the bike needs to go, aim the hips and body to follow the head, and make minor corrections with the hands.
4. Don’t brake while turning – brake first, then steer
5. If you are a bit wobbly, it will help if you increase your speed!

Visit www.britishcycling.org.uk/commuting for more details