Paul Oldham and Christina Wiejak win 2017 Three Peaks Cyclocross titles (gallery)

Annual race in the Yorkshire Dales sees hundreds of riders tackle a gruelling route - All photos by Andy Jones

Paul Oldham on his way to winning the Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Paul Oldham (Hope Factory Racing) claimed his third consecutive victory in the annual Three Peaks Cyclocross race in Yorkshire on Sunday. Christina Wiejak (Barrow Central Wheelers) finished the race as top-placed woman.

The event takes in the ascent and descent of a trio of gruelling climbs in the Yorkshire Dales: Ingleborough, Whernside and Pen-y-ghent.

Oldham came home three and a half minutes ahead of second-placed David Mirfield (unattached) with Alexander Forrester (zepnat.com) in third.

Christina Wiejak and Paul Oldham, winners of the Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Eleven-time Three Peaks winner Rob Jebb (Hope Factory Racing) had led the race up Simon Fell, but he crashed on the descent of Whernside. Although he completed the descent, he withdrew and was taken to hospital with suspected concussion.

Nick Craig (Scott UK) continued his participation in the race with a seventh place – having first won the event back in 1991. Another former winner and Three Peaks veteran, Tim Gould (zepnat.com) finished in 16th spot. Gould was the first over-50s veteran to arrive home, having won the race six times consecutively between 1984 and 1989.

Christina Wiejak, women's winner, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Wiejak took the women's crown ahead of Sarah Barber (North Hampshire RC), with Verity Appleyard (Brothertons Cycles) as third-placed woman.

The Three Peaks Cyclocross was first officially run in 1961.

Result

Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017, men

1. Paul Oldham (Hope Factory Racing), in 3-06-16

2. David Mirfield (Unattached), at 3-29

3. Alexander Forrester (zepnat.com), at 4-09

4. Adrian Lansley (Pedalon), at 6-14

5. Gary Macdonald (Hope Factory Racing), at 6-31

6. Giles Drake (Leisure Lakes Bikes), at 7-47

7. Nick Craig (Scott UK), at 9-03

8. Jonathan Pugh (The Bulls), at 9-21

9. Ben Bardsley (Cyclewise Altura), at 13-14

10. Thomas Zahnd (Unattached), at 14-09

Women

1. Christina Wiejak (Barrow Central Wheelers), in 4-05-44

2. Sarah Barber (North Hampshire RC), at 1-12

3. Verity Appleyard (Brothertons Cycles), at 9-06

4. Helen Jackson (Kendal CC), at 9-07

5. Hannah Saville (Cyclocrossrider.com), at 16-52

6. Karen Poole (Sportstest RT), at 24-30

7. Ruth Gamwell (Macclesfield Wheelers), at 26-23

8. Hannah Benson (Ilkley CC), at 27-41

9. Adeline Moreau (The 5th Floor), at 28-37

10. Clare Dallimore (Cardiff Ajax), at 29-15

Tim Gould, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Nick Craig, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Lewis Craven has a bit of fun. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Rob Jebb leads on Simon Fell, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Simon Fell, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Christina Wiejak, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Dutch former pro Richard Groenendaal, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

David Mirfield, Three Peaks Cyclocross 2017. Photo: Andy Jones
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Nigel Wynn
Nigel Wynn

Nigel Wynn worked as associate editor on CyclingWeekly.com, he worked almost single-handedly on the Cycling Weekly website in its early days. His passion for cycling, his writing and his creativity, as well as his hard work and dedication, were the original driving force behind the website’s success. Without him, CyclingWeekly.com would certainly not exist on the size and scale that it enjoys today. Nigel sadly passed away, following a brave battle with a cancer-related illness, in 2018. He was a highly valued colleague, and more importantly, n exceptional person to work with - his presence is sorely missed.