It is with great sadness that we announce that our colleague and friend Nigel Wynn has passed away.

Nigel, who worked as associate editor on CyclingWeekly.com, died on Wednesday night following a brave battle with a cancer-related illness.

Nigel’s association with Cycling Weekly began in 2003, when he was appointed deputy editor for the magazine, before later working on the website. His passion for cycling, his writing and his creativity, as well as his hard work and dedication, were the original driving force behind the website’s success. Without him, CyclingWeekly.com would certainly not exist on the size and scale that it enjoys today.

Nigel worked almost single-handedly in the early years of the website, working through evenings and weekends to write stage reports and cover the biggest races as well as wider cycling news. That work provided the foundation for the site to expand as it did from 2014, and Nigel played a vital role in running a small team of writers and diversifying the content we provided. He could turn his hand to any kind of story, from serious news to funny or tongue-in-cheek articles, and he wrote some of the site’s all-time most popular stories.

More importantly, Nigel was an exceptional person to work with. His support and respect for everyone – from senior managers to new starters – touched everyone here. His warm nature, kindness and generosity meant he was utterly reliable, and he would always put himself forward for unsociable shifts or tricky tasks before asking anyone else to do the same. Always gracious and self-effacing, he was wonderfully sharp and funny, and brightened every day that we worked together.

He never sought the limelight, but his impact on a variety of people working in the wider cycling community is testament to his personality and his work.

Rich Windsor, digital editor of Cycling Weekly, said: “Personally, I was lucky enough to know and work closely with Nigel for more than five years. He helped me begin my career and has been a key support ever since. While he reached many people through his work, I, and many others here, were fortunate to call him a good friend. He will always be sorely missed.”

Nigel is survived by his wife Sarah, and his children Oliver and Abigail.