Mark McNally on losing his shot at Eneco Tour stage victory: 'that's bike racing'

British rider Mark McNally says he won’t be losing any sleep after he and the breakaway were caught within sight of the line on stage three of the Eneco Tour

McNally Mark on stage three of the 2016 Eneco Tour
(Image credit: Graham Watson)

British Wanty-Groupe Gobert rider Mark McNally has said he’s not frustrated with the result of yesterday’s stage at the Eneco Tour, in which he and his breakaway companions were caught by the peloton within sight of the finish line.

The 27-year-old had been out front all day with Martin Elmiger (IAM Cycling), Jesper Asselman (Roompot), Stijn Steels (Topsport Vlaanderen-Baloise) and Yukiya Arashiro (Lampre-Merida) and the quintet held an advantage of 30 seconds with one kilometre to go but as they looked at each other to work the peloton roared up on them and Peter Sagan (Tinkoff) took the victory.

McNally placed fifth on the stage - the highest place of those in the break - and would have stood a good chance of chalking up his first win in a WorldTour race had the bunch not caught the breakaway yesterday.

>>> Eneco Tour 2016: Latest news, reports and info

But speaking to Cycling Weekly before the start of stage four in Aalter in Belgium he was sanguine about the way his chances evaporated.

“You can lose sleep over but its not going to change anything. It was what it was. Bike riding, that’s the beauty of it, sometimes it works out sometimes it doesn’t.”

McNally said he “didn’t think he could have done anything differently”.

He said: “Elmiger attacked at 2km to go and then everything sort of stalled. No one really wanted to take it on. And I knew if I went too early I would have been fifth from there, so I waited until I could do a good sprint.

Watch: Show us your scars - Mark McNally

“Obviously when those guys [the peloton] are coming there’s no stopping them.”

McNally added: “For the way it panned out I think I took the most I could out of it.”

He said that him and his Wanty teammates would continue to race aggressively and get in breakaways and try to win stages over the coming days. He was part of an early escape on Thursday's stage four, but was caught mid-way through the stage.

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Having trained as a journalist at Cardiff University I spent eight years working as a business journalist covering everything from social care, to construction to the legal profession and riding my bike at the weekends and evenings. When a friend told me Cycling Weekly was looking for a news editor, I didn't give myself much chance of landing the role, but I did and joined the publication in 2016. Since then I've covered Tours de France, world championships, hour records, spring classics and races in the middle east. On top of that, since becoming features editor in 2017 I've also been lucky enough to get myself sent to ride my bike for magazine pieces in Portugal and across the UK. They've all been fun but I have an enduring passion for covering the national track championships. It might not be the most glamorous but it's got a real community feeling to it.