dhb R2.0C road cycling shoes review

With a full carbon sole for only £65, the dhb R2.0C road cycling shoes are certainly impressive at first glance.

Cycling Weekly Verdict

Despite offering a full carbon sole for only £65, the dhb R2.0C road cycling shoes are let down by more ventilation and a fiddly adjustment system.

For
  • +

    Very comfortable

  • +

    Stiff full carbon sole

Against
  • -

    Fiddly adjustment system

  • -

    Poorly ventilated

  • -

The dhb R2.0C road cycling shoes are instantly comfortable, feeling like a pair of trainers, thanks to the wide forefoot, toe-box, high-volume fit and a relatively flat-profiled and very stiff carbon sole.

They are secured with two Velcro straps and a chunky ratchet. There are two small vents in the sole, small mesh panels on the sides and a few small holes in the toe area. The basic-looking insole has no venting holes, but is nevertheless comfortable, and the tongue is padded enough that I didn’t feel the straps.

>>> Cycling shoes: a buyer's guide

The immediate comfort comes at a price when out on the road, however. The wide forefoot never felt particularly supportive and my heels slipped around and lifted in the trainer-like heel.

Reaching down to tighten the fit caused the ratchet mechanism to dig into my foot uncomfortably. Releasing the tension is quite fiddly, as the button does not protrude much. I got some heel-rub against the cranks due to the width of the heel cup, too.

The ventilation from the small mesh panels is limited, which meant that, after a while, the shoes felt quite hot, and my feet got sweaty.

Head over to Wiggle for more details.

Henry Robertshaw

Henry Robertshaw began his time at Cycling Weekly working with the tech team, writing reviews, buying guides and appearing in videos advising on how to dress for the seasons. He later moved over to the news team, where his work focused on the professional peloton as well as legislation and provision for cycling. He's since moved his career in a new direction, with a role at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.