Annemiek van Vleuten: I needed a harder race to be able to drop Lotte Kopecky

The veteran was unable to defend her title despite repeatedly trying to break clear

Annemiek van Vleuten
(Image credit: Getty)

Annemiek van Vleuten required a harder race if she was to win the Tour of Flanders for a record third time, the Dutchwoman instead sprinting to second behind victor Lotte Kopecky.

The 39-year-old went into the race as defending champion and favourite, especially given that already this spring she has won Omloop Het Nieuwsblad and was second at Strade Bianche.

But despite the Movistar rider attacking multiple times on the famous cobbled climbs, Van Vleuten failed to shake Kopecky off her wheel, eventually going to the finish line with the Belgian and her SD Worx teammate Chantal Van den Broek-Blaak.

Van Vleuten knew that out-sprinting Kopecky would be a tough ask, but she was more disappointed with how the race was ridden by other teams than failing to overcome 26-year-old Kopecky.

"You know that if you go to the finish line with Lotte Kopecky, a super-fast sprinter, it's going to be hard," Van Vleuten said. "After the Paterberg, I knew my chances, my options, were running out.

"For me, the race in the middle part was not raced as hard. We arrived to the Koppenberg too big a group.

"To drop a ride like Kopecky on the Paterberg, I needed a harder race, especially because the climbs here are super-short. I needed a super-hard race to be able to drop a rider like Lotte Kopecky.

"Then people [could] say, 'why are you not doing that?' But I cannot do everything. I had hoped that other teams wanted to make the race hard, to drop people like Elisa Balsamo, for example. Maybe Trek I expected a bit more from them to also make the race harder."

>>> Belgian champion Lotte Kopecky takes momentous Tour of Flanders 2022 victory

Nevertheless, Van Vleuten was not too dejected with being second best, as she now turns her focus to the Ardennes where she will aim to win Liège-Bastogne-Liège for a second time and La Flèche Wallonne.

"I'm proud of it," she said. "To be in the mix again, to always be fighting for the win in this race is not easy. There's also a lot of stress to always be in the front, and I think we nailed it as a team. I am super-proud of my team.

"I cannot blame myself for something. It's not like when I go back and watch the race tonight I will say that I lost it somewhere.

"The further we get to Liège and Flèche, the more it's in my favour."

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Chris Marshall-Bell
Chris Marshall-Bell

Chris first started writing for Cycling Weekly in 2013 on work experience and has since become a regular name in the magazine and on the website. Reporting from races, long interviews with riders from the peloton and riding features drive his love of writing about all things two wheels.


Probably a bit too obsessed with mountains, he was previously found playing and guiding in the Canadian Rockies, and now mostly lives in the Val d’Aran in the Spanish Pyrenees where he’s a ski instructor in the winter and cycling guide in the summer. He almost certainly holds the record for the most number of interviews conducted from snowy mountains.