WFSGI responds to suspension of disc brakes by UCI

While pro riders have spoken out in criticism of disc brakes after Fran Ventoso’s injury at Paris-Roubaix, the World Federation of the Sporting Goods Industry (WFSGI), which represents the cycling and wider sports industries, has spoken out in support of the technology, saying that it still sees discs as having a future in professional road racing.

Robert de Kock, the WFSGI General Secretary, said that while the organisation supported the suspension of the UCI’s disc brake trial, the world governing body needed to move quickly to work towards a solution.

“The suspension was decided by the UCI for safety reasons and can be supported therefore. Nevertheless the WFSGI asks the UCI to immediately start the collaboration with all stakeholders on the future of disc brakes and safety in road racing.”


Watch: what do pro riders really think of disc brakes


With little conclusive evidence that Ventoso’s injury was caused by a disc brake, something which has been questioned by Lampre-Merida manager Brent Copeland, the WFSGI also called on the UCI to carry out a “clear and proper investigation” into the accident from Paris-Roubaix, with any final decisions being made on the outcomes of said investigation.

Whatever the outcome of the investigation, the WFSGI remains confident that its work in lobbying the UCI to introduce disc brakes into the professional peloton last August will not be in vain, and disc brakes will still be used in professional road races in the future.

“The suspension was decided by the UCI for safety reasons and can be supported therefore. Nevertheless the WFSGI asks the UCI to immediately start the collaboration with all stakeholders on the future of disc brakes and safety in road racing.”

  • RobTM

    I see.. so no-one needs to replace Alu rims.. just doesn’t happen, right? Meanwhile in the real world, ppl who don’t replace rims can have them blow apart when riding, nevermind have them ruined by a small piece of grit getting lodged in brake block at the wrong moment. The relative poor carbon braking performance can be seen on a steep descent with tight bends

  • NitroFan

    Hi Tim,
    Just like those that denounce those whose who view anyone with a view that opposes theirs as haters, I find the mindset that then attacks without any evidence others riding commitment / ability equally juvenile and irritating!

    Sounds to me like you have your priorities just about spot on! When the kids are older they can do some pace making for dad! Don’t get me started on old creaky etc!!
    Nice to chat!

  • Tim Williams

    Yep, that was when I was younger and without kids. Now 3 kids take priority over my riding. One though wants to race so I might be back at the big miles soon. It is harder though now that I am old. Lol

  • NitroFan

    Ouch! 🙂

  • NitroFan

    I always question the rational and level of involvement of the people that label people that take a different view on kit to them as “haters” I have rarely if ever heard it being used on club runs or by pro’s but occasionally in shops and then nearly always by customers with all the gear, yet one suspects little in the way of experience or ……………….

  • Tim Williams

    It is not that we hate them but that for road racing they are not needed.

  • Tim Williams

    Nope don’t ride a lot just 40 to 80 miles a day 7 days a week 364 days a year for 10 plus years in Michigan. Then I started to lay off a little so milage did decrease. Also I have looked at and riden carbon hoops with no braking issues at all. I do work in the industry and need to make sure I am informed. I also suggest discs in certain circumstances and believe that they have their place but not in the pro peleton or on my road bike, my gravel grinder is a different story though. And my track bike is of course free of brakes, as it should be.

  • RobTM

    You can’t ride an awful lot!! Or are just a fair weather rider. Also you appear not to have noticed how noisy and relatively poor the breaking on carbon rims really is.. just look at a set and the surface the blocks have to grip.. it’s very poor and inefficient

  • Howmanyjackos

    Brian they make perfect sense to you . The 700c disc also doubles as a wheel .it requires only two very light calipers to make braking inertia. Its simple and very effective. . Adding a disc , stronger laced wheel, hydraulic brake fluid /calliper / and one sided frame and fork strength (single purpose wheel rim) is not too clever..not sure which tests you are reffering to?

  • Howmanyjackos

    Ha ha, was laughing at the ridiculous cassette / mega long cage derailleur and then the weight penalty ! But well worth it as you have less ratios to click through! add to that the new obsession with slowing down (razor discss) and you have it.
    Im very safe, unconfused and completely gullable..not the type of person you’d want to ride with though..!

  • Stevo

    And don’t forget “endurance” frames.

  • Stevo

    It’s tempting but I’m going to try and wait a year or two until they bring out 1×11.

  • Howmanyjackos

    Well said sir, now all u need is a 1×12 drivetrain and a suspension soggy frame.
    Industry driven crap …

  • Stevo

    Google or Specialized. Hard to judge which is sh*ttier really.

  • Pep R

    I have discs and for me the main pro is easily achieving full power from the hoods, but if i was a pro i wouldn’t wanna be in a peloton with them

  • Tim Williams

    You must not take care of your equipment. I have an aluminum wheelsets with over 15 years of daily (including winter) training done on it and it is still my go to wheelset.

  • Brian Miloscia

    Back to my original post, I indicated that the resistance to discs amongst the Fred’s is that they don’t want to concede their very expensive road bike just a year or two old or a little older is obsolete. No disc brakes aren’t necessary …but they do perform better. Just like carbon fiber frames aren’t necessary but they perform better. Most of the tech on ur bike isn’t necessary but it adds performance.

    For me, riding in traffic in roads of dubious condition in wet conditions etc., I want that added performance.

    Just like most Freds don’t need that S-works frame or Italian components… They just are willing to pay for more performance.

  • Brian Miloscia

    It’s called Google. Use it to search things. Show me where caliper brakes showed greater stopping power or modulation? For braking performance there is no dispute.

    You may argue whether the weight or aero penalty outweighs the pure braking performance benefits but on braking performance there is absolutely no doubt and no one would argue that calipers have more stopping power or modulation than discs.

    Discs also require less regular maintenance so there’s that as well.

  • MrHaematocrit

    I have bikes with hydraulic disc brakes, traditional rim brakes and hydraulic rim brakes by far the very best imho is the hydro rim brakes, they offer a very similar experience to disc brakes without the weight or impacting hub and spoke layout. I think its a shame that not enough investment has been put into developing them further.

  • MrHaematocrit

    Ohh I would be interested in seeing performance tests confirm that disc brakes are far superior, as I’m not aware of any data which has proven this yet. It seems to be peoples opinion by large. Do you have a link to said tests.

  • NitroFan

    I agree lots of cash in getting people to upgrade if the people that really know about riding bikes the tour pros where all clambering for them I might think hey these must be a big advantage but currently they are not. Aesthetically I do not like them.

  • NitroFan

    I have them on my Hybrid and not on my road bike because i am quite heavy I find that unless I put on big heavy rotas and clean them with brake cleaner before every single ride the discs are actually worse at stopping than regular rim brakes

  • RobTM

    One reason for discs, is carbon wheels can then become cheaper, as the rim won’t have to disipate the heat generated by all the braking on an alpine descent. And actually having followed the tail end of a race down a descent in Mallorca, when everyone presumed everyone had passed, but hadn’t… it was clear, that the race machine with fancy carbon wheels and top of line equipment, braked no better than my steel Raleigh. Very different story with good bikes with other wheels. Secondly in Winter Riding, the rims do get mucky from spray even if you manage to avoid all puddles. Aluminium is way softer than old steel, so rim wear or damage is very possible and rapid.

  • RobTM

    Whilst I agree with much of what you said… but tri-bars do make good bike handling more difficult, outside of time trials and solo training rides I rather folk don’t have them.

  • Brian Miloscia

    It’s quite simple…no one wants to believe their $8,000 s works is obsolete. I believe the resistance among the fred class is because they have so much invested in the bike they already have. Of course disc brakes are far superior. All performance tests confirm this. I just laugh at the people who argue caliper brakes are good enough… Right. Aluminum is good enough too. So why do you have a carbon fiber bike, with carbon fiber bottle cages, and $3,000 wheels? Because u wanted a bike that was “good enough?”. Discs are the future. And for anyone not racing in the pro peloton… They may perfect sense.

  • Gary Simpson

    It depends if anyone else lies about hurting them selves on them

  • Dave2020

    You hit the nail on the head Stevo. The benefits of innovation in cycle design are often marginal and sometimes non-existent, but that doesn’t stop the industry hype, since that’s all about profit.

    KISS. The rear rim brake caliper does the job. 9-10-11-speed/narrow chain transmissions are bad engineering – period, yet they’re forced onto the gullible consumer. (together with deliberate but unnecessary design changes to make old and new systems incompatible!)

  • Andrew Jones

    I remember when brake cables went from poking out of the top of the hoods to being routed under the bar tape, people actually thought that was dangerous because you could hit a bump in the road, get bounced off your bars and grab hold of the cables to regain control, seriously I heard it a few times!

    Then there was tri-bars which were dangerous because you were too far away from the brakes and couldn’t steer properly.

    Then disk wheels because those were lethal in side winds, the alternative tri-spoke wheels could apparently break your arm if it got caught in the wheel when you crashed.

    Carbon fiber frames because those snap in half.

    Clipless pedals ruined your knees and a leather strap and metal cage holding your foot to the pedal was a lot safer… apparently!

    Helmets, well they obstructed your vison or make your head wider so it had more chance of hitting the road or even encouraged drivers to give you less space when overtaking.

    Pretty much every new technological advance in cycling has come with claims and concerns about its safety.

    Disk brakes give much better brake modulation which allows a rider to get much closer to the limits of grip of the tyre especially in the wet, try doing a stoppie on a bike with disks vs rim brakes. Having a mix of rim and disk brakes in the peloton is far more dangerous, you have a group of riders who can stop a lot quicker than everyone else.

  • Leodis75

    I wouldn’t worry, the same traditionalists said the same with carbon, they said the same with 11 speed, they always moan.

  • Stevo

    I doubt anyone hates discs. Many people are, however, sceptical when commercial organisations try to influence policy decisions in a way that is so clearly to their advantage.

  • Jay

    Just don’t quite understand the minds behind the disc haters. Those who aren’t ignorant truly know the undisputed fact that they provide greater feel, control, power and less hand force to operate. Generally ‘better’ brakes but yet they refuse to accept it.

  • roddders

    No they’re not. No they won’t.

  • llos25

    In your opinion ?