Lizzie Armitstead suffers crash just seconds after winning Women's Tour stage one (video)

Lizzie Armitstead may have collided with a spectator or a protruding barrier after winning stage one of the Women's Tour

Lizzie Armitstead, Boels-Dolmans, Aviva Women's Tour 2015 team presentation
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

Just moments after winning the first stage of the 2015 Women's Tour in Aldeburgh, Lizzie Armitstead suffered a nasty crash metres from the finish line.

According to the Telegraph's Tom Cary, the British Olympic silver medalist may have collided with a person or people 50-metres beyond the line and required the attention of paramedics on the scene.

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BBC Suffolk, however, claim that the Boels Dolmans rider hit a protruding barrier at the side of the road, which caused her to crash.

The YouTube video below captures the moment of the incident, with a number of other riders also coming off their bikes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW7zuDB876k

Armitstead was said to have been fitted with a neck brace and given oxygen by medical staff but was seen moving her arms and hands while being treated on the tarmac.

Thirty minutes after the incident, she was taken away on a stretcher with her head in a brace.

Cary later reported that Armitstead collided with a group of photographers and Mick Bennett, Technical Director of race organiser SweetSpot.

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Later reports suggest that Armitstead suffered a broke leg in the crash, which would jeopardise her hopes for world championship glory in September.

 Wiggle Honda on the Women's Tour 2015

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Stuart Clarke

Stuart Clarke is a News Associates trained journalist who has worked for the likes of the British Olympic Associate, British Rowing and the England and Wales Cricket Board, and of course Cycling Weekly. His work at Cycling Weekly has focused upon professional racing, following the World Tour races and its characters.