Lezyne Carbon Drive Lite mini pump review

The Lezyne Carbon Drive Lite is easily pocketable and will inflate to high pressures

Cycling Weekly Verdict

Short, light, efficient - this is a quality pump

For
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    Efficient up to 100psi

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    Very pocketable

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    Light

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    Schraeder compatible

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Against
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    Not very comfortable at higher pressures

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    Need to attach hose to pump before using

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    Screwing onto valve is fiddly

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    End caps can get lost

The Lezyne Carbon Drive Lite mini pump is a ‘traditional’ pump, where the hose connects to the end of the barrel and you pump by pushing down on the handle. The tube is stored in the pump body and has to be screwed into the pump before use, rather than being integrated and pulled out of the handle. Insert the tube one way and it will fit presta valves; screw it in the other way around and it fits schrader valves. There’s also a pressure relief button, should you get carried away and over-inflate your tyre.

>>> Read more: Mini bike pump buyer's guide

Attaching the hose to the valve is a bit fiddly as it is quite stiff. There is also a risk of disturbing the valve core and losing air when unscrewing the adaptor after use. The two rubber end caps are attached to the pump with quite flimsy O-rings and can get lost.

Although this was the second shortest and lightest pump on test, it achieved the highest pressure, getting close to 100psi after 200 strokes. It was not the most comfortable to use, however, as there are some sharp edges on the handle and the stroke is short.

Pocketability is great, with the pump only protruding a little from a shallow rear jersey pocket, giving no concerns that it might fall out. There’s a bottle cage mount with four plastic clips and a sturdy Velcro strap to keep everything together too.

Paul Norman
Paul Norman

Paul started writing for Cycling Weekly in 2015, covering cycling tech, new bikes and product testing. Since then, he’s reviewed hundreds of bikes and thousands of other pieces of cycling equipment for the magazine and the Cycling Weekly website.

He’s been cycling for a lot longer than that though and his travels by bike have taken him all around Europe and to California. He’s been riding gravel since before gravel bikes existed too, riding a cyclocross bike through the Chilterns and along the South Downs.