Fuji Bikes suspend sale of American police bikes used in 'violent tactics' during protests as Trek faces criticism

Fuji said seeing its bicycles deployed in this manner during the George Floyd protests went against their intended use

New York City Police Department (NYPD) on bikes patrol a closed off Times Square shorty before the 11 p.m. curfew went into effect June 1, 2020 (Photo by Timothy A. Clary/ AFP via Getty Images)
(Image credit: AFP via Getty Images)

Fuji Bikes has suspended its sales of bicycles to North American police forces following the George Floyd protests.

The company says its bikes have been used in "violent tactics" by police forces during the unrest across the United States, which went against the intended use of the product.

In a statement, Fuji Bikes said: "In the last week, we have seen our bicycles used in violent tactics that we did not intend or design them to be used for.

"In an effort to work towards real change, Bike Co. the North American distributor of Fuji Bikes, is suspending the sale of police bikes."

>>> Dr Marlon Moncrieffe calls for transformation of British cycling community in light of George Floyd’s death

Footage emerged of a police officer in New York using his bike to push back protestors, with further reports coming in of bicycles being used by police as a mix between a riot shield and a baton.

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Meanwhile, a video showing Miami Police Department's "elite" Bike Response Team using Trek bicycles has gone viral with people highlighting one officer's exuberant and less than graceful dismount during a demonstration of how they are apparently being deployed to handle large crowds and protests.

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Trek released a lengthy statement concerning the protests, titled "When justice is not enough", saying: "George Floyd's murder should be a wakeup call to actually do something that will provide real hope and real change for millions of Americans...now is the time to ask the hard questions, have the difficult conversations, and create the big ideas. If we do that, then we might find real justice."

However, the statement has come under criticism for not addressing the company's sale of bikes to police forces, with one person calling it "corporate lip service".

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Specialized was another bike brand to release a statement, saying it had been part of cycling's "problem with race" over the past decades, describing cycling as a "walled garden of exclusion".

"We aren’t looking for plaudits, and we’re not here to signal our outrage," the statement read, as the company asked their customers to tell them how they can do better in the future.

Jonny Long

Hi. I'm Cycling Weekly's Weekend Editor. I like writing offbeat features and eating too much bread when working out on the road at bike races. I'm 6'0", 26 years old, have a strong hairline and have an adequate amount of savings for someone my age. I'm very single at the minute so if you know anyone, hit me up.


Before joining Cycling Weekly I worked at The Tab, reporting about students evacuating their bowels on nightclub dancefloors and consecrating their love on lecture hall floors. I've also written for Vice, Time Out, and worked freelance for The Telegraph (I know, but I needed the money at the time so let me live).


I also worked for ITV Cycling between 2011-2018 on their Tour de France and Vuelta a España coverage. Sometimes I'd be helping the producers make the programme and other times I'd be getting the lunches. Just in case you were wondering - Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen had the same ham sandwich every day, it was great.