Disc brake Battaglin Power+ steel frameset launched

New variant with new colour scheme joins the rim brake model

(Image credit: Mirco Vettore)

Officina Battaglin hand builds its steel frames in Italy, with the Power+ being a modern fillet brazed frameset, designed to be kitted out for a more modern look than the brand’s retro machines.

Battaglin has now brought out a disc brake version to be sold alongside its existing rim brake bike.

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The disc brake bike is still made from Columbus Spirit triple butted tubing, but comes with a blue-base colour scheme rather than the rim brake bike’s black or white. It features oversized main frame tubes for a chunky look. Battaglin says that it’s a contemporary reinterpretation of one of the best-selling Battaglin steel frame in the 90s ridden by the Refin pro team.

New frameset comes with flat mount disc brake connections and thru-axles
(Image credit: Mirco Vettore)

According to Giovanni Battaglin, the owner of the brand: "The old Power+ was one of the most appreciated steel bikes of its era. We still get questions about it by customers and collectors, and this means people still like it. The '+' symbol is something that draws attention because it's unusual."

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Battaglin was one of the foremost racers of his generation, winning both the Giro d’Italia and the Vuelta a Espana in 1981.

It's still built in fillet brazed Columbus steel tubing though
(Image credit: Mirco Vettore)

"We've been working with Columbus since the early 80s. It's a strong collaboration between two Italian brands who still innovate with steel. Today Columbus can produce stiff, lightweight tubing like the new Spirit HSS.

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“You can build a steel frame that weighs less than 2 kilos, and if you assemble it with lightweight carbon wheels and components the complete bike can be less than 7.5 kilos," he continues.

Although the Power+ Disc’s frame is steel, it comes with an all-carbon tapered fork with internal brake hose routing. It also features 12mm front and rear thru-axles and an English thread bottom bracket shell.

 

Paul Norman
Paul Norman

Paul started writing for Cycling Weekly in 2015, covering cycling tech, new bikes and product testing. Since then, he’s reviewed hundreds of bikes and thousands of other pieces of cycling equipment for the magazine and the Cycling Weekly website.

He’s been cycling for a lot longer than that though and his travels by bike have taken him all around Europe and to California. He’s been riding gravel since before gravel bikes existed too, riding a cyclocross bike through the Chilterns and along the South Downs.