iPump Twist mini pump review

The Twist is a super-lightweight pump, but usability suffers as a result

Cycling Weekly Verdict

A weight-weenie's dream but with limited usability

For
  • +

    Very small and light

  • +

    Will achieve get-you-home pressures

Against
  • -

    Not very efficient

  • -

    Gets hot in use

  • -

    Expensive

  • -

The iPump Twist mini pump is tiny and incredibly light at just 25g. The very thin hose, which is Presta-only, is pulled out of the handle and screws onto the valve. The handle can then be twisted at 90 degrees to provide a more comfortable handhold. Both the pump body and piston are made of carbon-fibre, to achieve the astonishingly low weight.

>>> Read more: Mini bike pump buyer's guide

The valve connector was fiddly to screw on and off and it was quite easy to disturb the valve core and lose pressure. With its small volume and short stroke, it was no surprise that this pump achieved the lowest pressure in the test, reaching just over 60psi after 200 strokes. Those strokes were difficult to achieve, due to the force required to squeeze the air into the tyre and the limited hand purchase. The pump body also got quite hot. The manufacturer claims 120psi is achievable – maybe, if you are Popeye with asbestos hands and enjoy standing on the verge for extended periods.

Nevertheless, this pump can achieve a get-you-home pressure, which is not bad considering its weight and size. Its exotic construction and materials also make it the most expensive pump on test, and you’ll have to wait for it to be shipped from Japan as at the time of going to press there is no UK distributor.

There’s no frame mount, though that’s not really a problem when the pump almost disappears into a jersey pocket with little chance of it falling out again.

Paul Norman
Paul Norman

Paul started writing for Cycling Weekly in 2015, covering cycling tech, new bikes and product testing. Since then, he’s reviewed hundreds of bikes and thousands of other pieces of cycling equipment for the magazine and the Cycling Weekly website.

He’s been cycling for a lot longer than that though and his travels by bike have taken him all around Europe and to California. He’s been riding gravel since before gravel bikes existed too, riding a cyclocross bike through the Chilterns and along the South Downs.