Edco Four-8 wheelset

A smooth rolling wheelset to give you an aero advantage

Cycling Weekly Verdict

Edco's Four-8 wheels are a fast and versatile set of performance carbon wheels, with the wide oval rim profile providing a comfortable ride on rougher roads. The complete package is good, but these don't sit head and shoulders above the competitors in terms of weight and price.

For
  • +

    Comfortable for the depth

  • +

    Good handling

  • +

    Quality finishing

Against
  • -

    Weight/price doesn't stand out

  • -

  • -

Edco’s Four-8 wheelset is, well, exactly what it says on the tin; a 48mm set of hoops. It’s a rim depth that lends itself to those looking for versatility, wheels that hold their own on the flats but still feel spritely on the climbs.

The first thing to say is that Edco’s all-rounders are available in both rim and disc versions. While the cycling industry seems to be heading in the single direction of disc brakes, I stuck with the tried and tested rim brake bike for this test.

The Four-8 wheels are UD full carbon clincher with enhanced 3K brake tracks, and come supplied with Edco’s own brake pads. The wheels are fitted with Sapim CX Delta aero-bladed spokes, with 16 radial spokes at the front and 24 cross 2:1 ratio at the rear.

>>> Wheel deals: big savings on Zipp, Campagnolo, Vision, Fulcrum, HED and more

The most noticeable part of the wheel’s build is the rim width. The Four-8s are some of the widest road wheels I’ve used, with the oval-profile rim measuring 28.7mm externally below the brake track and slightly less than 28mm from the centre of the brake surface, with an internal width of 21mm. That width meant the 25mm Pirelli P-Zero tyres I was using actually measured up just shy of 28mm, so - as Edco suggests - you’d need to run 23mm tyres if you were aiming to get a width of 25mm. I ran clinchers while testing, though the wheels come tubeless ready, with no issues or struggles getting the tyres on and seated.

Many brands within the industry are using wider rims, reportedly due to a claimed aerodynamic improvement. While I can’t attest to any savings these wheels made, the wide contact point provided with the ballooned tyre certainly inspired more confidence when cornering and on the treacherous mid-winter roads of southern England.

The fit of these wheels between my Dura-Ace BR-R9100 brakes with the pads provided was on the limit for me. Shimano says its recommended maximum width is 28mm, and I was able to make it work with the unused pads that came with the wheels. On a previous test of these wheels with Ultegra 6810 brakes our reviewer had no issues with the fit however.

As mentioned the majority of my testing was done in the season in which you’re least likely to want to use your nice carbon wheels. But it meant I was able to pit these against a variety of conditions, including some windy and wet days.

The fit of these wheels between my Dura-Ace BR-R9100 brakes with the pads provided was on the limit for me. Shimano says its recommended maximum width is 28mm, but I was able to make it work with the unused pads that came with the wheels. On a previous test of these wheels with Ultegra 6810 brakes our reviewer had no issues with the fit however.

As mentioned the majority of my testing was done in the season in which you’re least likely to want to use your nice carbon wheels. But it meant I was able to pit these against a variety of conditions, including some windy and wet days.

They’re nicely responsive and stiff enough that they accelerate well, but I found they were more in their element when up to speed. The wheels felt stable even in some strong winds, being 193cm tall and 83kg this isn't something that affects me hugely anyway, but previous testers at 57kg have felt equally assured and free from hedgerow wobbles. The NEO·1 hubs aren’t especially noisy if that’s something you’re looking for compared to overtly loud designs out there.

The most notable aspect of these wheels in comparison to other wheels I’ve used more recently is their comfort on rough roads. The width surely contributes to the lack of chatter and harsh impact when bombing down the country lanes, and this was a key reason they were so enjoyable to ride.

In terms of braking performance, these were great in the dry though not exceptional amongst other carbon wheels I've used. As with nearly all carbon brakes there’s a certain diminished response when things get wet outside, but these sustained their usability throughout albeit with a slight adjustment in braking time.

Compatability is plentiful, we've got the rim brake models but these come in rim and disc brake guise, with Shimano/SRAM 11 speed, Campagnolo and SRAM XDR compatibility available - the latter so you can run them with SRAM eTap AXS.

The claimed weight is 1580g, +/-20g, although we weighed them in at 1548g (670g front, 878g rear). Coming in at £989, the Edco's are still a bit heavier than some of the competition - Hunt's 50 Carbon Aero Wide come in at 1,537g at £799 whilst Parcours' closest relation is the Passista at 56mm, weighing 1,420g for £899.

I tested the Four-8s with the Red/White decals, but if you prefer a more subtle look you can also get them in a Black Anthracite colourway.