In association with Cycle SOS here are our top five tips for safe commuting by bike

Commuting by bike is much safer than many people think. According to government statistics, one cyclist is killed on Britain’s roads for every 27 million miles travelled by bike – the equivalent to over 1,000 times around the world.

The same stats suggest you are more likely to be injured in an hour of gardening than in an hour of cycling. To lower your risk further, in association with Cycle SOS, here are our top five tips for safe commuting

 1. Be visible

Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 10.35.23Most Cyclists think they are far more visible than they actually are. 15 per cent of accidents occur in the dark and low light conditions. A huge range of lights is available, but reflective clothing dramatically increases your visibility.

 >>> Buyer’s guide to bike lights (video)

Be aware that because the way human eyes work, you are less visible at dawn and dusk, so take extra care. You don’t have to dress up as a lollipop person either, with lots of tastefully high-visibility kit becoming available.

 2. Don’t be afraid to use the road

You have as much right to be there as motorists. This means give space to parked cars and be aware of car doors that could open. A fact worth remembering is that passenger doors cause more accidents than driver doors as passengers are less likely to check mirrors.

 >>> Cyclist sues council after pothole injuries

A doors width clearance is sensible and don’t hug the curb either. Drains, potholes, and road debris mean that riding in the gutter can be hazardous and there is a lot more chance of punctures. 16 per cent of accidents are caused by a pot hole/defective road surface.

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3. Be cautious about filtering

As cyclists we are allowed to filter through traffic like motorcycles. However, don’t undertake large vehicles such as HGVs and buses and be aware of vehicles turning left.

Most accidents occur at junctions. Be conscious that drivers have a blind spot. Take extra care at or when approaching junctions.

According to Cycle SOS, 40 per cent of the claims they handle involve vehicles emerging from side roads and 11 per cent of accidents occur on roundabouts.

4. Respect other road users

Respect other road users and avoid confrontation. Should you be on the receiving end of an aggressive road user, remain calm and polite. Your tone of voice can diffuse the situation, however, it is unlikely that you will be able to change an irate driver’s mind, so just back away.

>>> Angry motorist takes a tumble while chasing a cyclist (video)

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5. Maintain your bike

Routinely check your bike. Having working brakes and gears will not just make your commute more enjoyable it will also make you safer as two per cent of claims arise from a product or mechanical fault. Remember, should you be unfortunate enough to have an accident, but are riding a bike without working brakes you could be considered culpable.

>>> Click here to learn how to adjust your gears 

Commuting by bike saves money, saves the environment, eases congestion and makes you healthier.

  • TrevorHoldsworth

    You can also spend time on Google Earth to check out safer/faster alternatives. In particular, if you find a junction dangerous and worrisome, check out any alternatives, even if they are a little slower. I spent two hours one Saturday afternoon doing this and found a faster section and some great summer alternatives (tracks/paths that are not suitable when there is no daylight).

  • adrianoconnor

    Another thing worth thinking about is having two sets of lights at the front, and two at the rear (even if the second set are a bit rubbish or basic) — always worth having a backup if anything goes wrong with a light (like maybe falling off when you hit a pot hole). Also means you can have one static and one flashing, which seems to make you more noticeable.