Maap Team Bib Evo bib shorts review

Premium shorts with a performance that doesn’t disappoint, although pricier than some close competitors

Maap
(Image credit: Stefan Abram)
Cycling Weekly Verdict

The materials and construction of the Team Bib Evo bib shorts proved to be excellent, remaining comfortable for long rides in hot weather, as well as for all-out efforts in summer showers. The low bulk but high density of the chamois was also a real winner. However, other brands are making shorts to a similarly high standard, such as La Passione with its Prestige bib shorts and Endura with its Pro SL Bib Shorts. With shorts such as these as the context, it’s hard to recommend paying the premium for the Team Bib Evo shorts.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Wide leg grippers and bib straps

  • +

    Comfy chamois

  • +

    Supportive feel

  • +

    Good breathability

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    There are cheaper alternatives offering a similar level of performance

Maap’s Team Bib Evo is the Australian brand’s mid-priced bib short, offering a more even balance between performance and price compared to the other shorts in the range. 

Having gotten started in Melbourne back in 2014, Maap has made a name for itself with its emphasis on high performance and sustainability.

The construction: Maap Team Bib Evo bib shorts 

Starting with the provenance of the fabrics, all those used in these shorts are made in Italy and are Bluesign approved – certifying that the textiles are safe for the environment, workers and customers. 

The chamois itself comes from (Italian based) Elastic Interface, but is a new “Proprietary 3D Thermo Moulded multi density chamois”, and so you won’t be finding this in the seat of shorts from other brands. 

Maap

(Image credit: Stefan Abram)

The main panels are said to have been designed to be anti-pilling and offer high abrasion resistance as well as not wearing thin over time (as some Lyrca does). It’s also designed to be versatile for rain or shine, with a DWR (durable water repellent coating) as well as a UPF50+ sun protection factor – although the stark tan lines of my legs are a testament to the fact that I’m yet to come across a set of shorts which doesn’t have this level of sun protection.

Maap

(Image credit: Stefan Abram)

The leg grippers are wide, flat and elasticated, just like the bib straps. Although unlike the bib straps, the leg grippers do feature a hexagonally patterned silicone gripper inside to keep the shorts in place. 

Maap

(Image credit: Stefan Abram)

The ride

Pulling on the Team Bib Evo bib shorts, there’s a reassuringly compressive and supportive feel. The four-way stretch of the fabric meant they moulded perfectly to my skin and weren’t constrictive in any way. 

Riding through a range of summer showers, I found that the DWR coating worked well for brief and light spells, with the water just beading off. But for longer durations or heavier downpours, the water does still soak through the shorts and leaves you just as wet as any other. Sure enough, my thighs did stay totally protected from the sun’s rays and they never required the application of suncream.

In hot and humid conditions, the shorts managed the heat and moisture management admirably, with the panels not feeling clammy and the chamois quickly wicking sweat away from my skin. They weren’t quite as airy as a set of dedicated lightweight, hot-weather climbing shorts, but they were more than sufficient for UK conditions.

Maap

(Image credit: Stefan Abram)

The bib straps have a good amount of stretch to them, but with the elastic still taut enough to feel as though it’s really keeping the bibs in place. The straps do form a little extra loop below the join at the front of the shorts, this isn’t noticeable when riding, but I did find I caught my thumbs in it when pulling the shorts on, which was a little annoying. 

The leg length is as long as is currently fashionable, but I found not so long as to cause any annoyance with my knees. However, the sizing is a little on the small side – at 177cm and 68kg, a size small was fine for me, but if I had a few kilos more I might well have needed to size up to a medium and its proportionality longer legs. 

Maap

(Image credit: Stefan Abram)

The proprietary chamois was really rather good. Some chamois are a little spongey and therefore don’t offer much in the way of isolation from road buzz, or much too bulky at the front where padding isn’t actually needed. But with these, the high density of the padding underneath my sitbones provided a comfortable perch on long rides, while the low bulk at the front meant there was no distraction when committing to all out efforts.

Value

The quality of the construction and materials of the Maap’s Maap Team Bib Evo bib shorts means they’re unlikely to disappoint and at £195, they are cheaper than Maap’s Pro Bib Short at £220 and Assos’ Cento Evo Bib Shorts at £225, as well as many other brands also with shorts well over £200.

But just because some of the competition is even more expensive than the Team Bib Evo isn’t sufficient to justify its price. La Passione’s Prestige bib shorts cost just £145, have a similarly good fit and performance – as well as the company having a similar commitment to sustainable production.

Endura’s Pro SL Bib Shorts are even better value at £129.99 and so impressed that they made it into our 2020 Editor’s Choice awards.

Verdict 

The materials and construction of the Team Bib Evo bib shorts proved to be excellent, remaining comfortable for long rides in hot weather, as well as for all-out efforts in summer showers. The low bulk but high density of the chamois was also a real winner. However, other brands are making shorts to a similarly high standard, such as La Passione with its Prestige bib shorts and Endura with its Pro SL Bib Shorts. With shorts such as these as the context, it’s hard to recommend paying the premium for the Team Bib Evo shorts.

Specs
Weight189g (size small, measured)
SizesXS–XXL
ColoursBlack, Navy