'The Tour is one of my objectives but I'm staying calm,' says Martínez after Dauphiné win

The Colombian says he'll keep his feet on the ground despite overhauling Thibaut Pinot to win the French stage race

Dani Martínez finishing the Critérium du Dauphiné 2020 (Photo by Anne-Christine Poujoulat/Pool via Getty Images)
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Dani Martínez says the Tour de France is one of his objectives but has promised to keep his feet on the ground after taking the biggest win of his career so far, the overall victory at the Critérium du Dauphiné.

After the abandon of Primož Roglič (Jumbo-Visma) before the final stage five, Martínez was fourth on GC and 12 seconds behind Pinot.

The Frenchman suffered in the closing kilometres, failing to keep up with the flurry of attacks that closed out this year's race, with the EF Pro Cycling rider keeping his nerve to finish second on the stage behind Sepp Kuss and take the yellow jersey.

"When they told me this morning that Roglič wasn’t starting, I knew that the race would be frantic from the start," Martínez said. "When Pinot and Landa went clear, the team worked for me and I kept myself as fresh as possible in the hope that I could win the race."

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Having bided his time, Martínez was ready to pounce after Pinot cracked.

"My DS was giving me the time gaps on Pinot on the final climb. I was right at my limit but completely determined right to the end. This is one of the most important races in the world, some famous Colombians have won it and to join them makes me very happy," the 24-year-old said.

Martínez will line up for his second Tour de France in two weeks and says that the French Grand Tour is one of his objectives, but that despite this win he promises to measure his aspirations.

"The Tour is also one of my objectives but I’m staying calm and keeping my feet on the ground," he said.

Jonny Long

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