Tour de France combativity award: how does it work?

Riders get awarded a red number, but what do you have to do to win it?

The Tour de France has many prizes available, but it isn’t all about the yellow, green, polka-dot and white jerseys. A red number is up for grabs as well.

Every day a rider will be awarded with the ‘most combative rider’ award that usually goes to the rider who was the last man to be caught from the early breakaway or to a rider who has put in a top performance on that particular stage

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The official rules say the prize rewards “the rider who gives the biggest effort and shows the best sportsmanship.”

But who decides which rider takes this award and a quick trip to the podium for a framed red number and a cuddly toy?

>>> Tour de France 2020 route: Eight mountain finishes and uphill time trial to decide 107th edition

The award was first introduced to the race for the 1952 edition and has since been shaped into the classification it is today.

The daily prize is awarded by a jury chaired by the race director, though in recent years has also been voted for online by fans, who are able to choose between certain riders that have animated the stage. That rider is then given a red number to where on the following stage to show he was the most combative from the previous day.

You are often more likely to get the prize if you are French.

A super-combativity prize is also awarded to a rider at the end of the Tour de France, which is selected solely by the race jury. The 2019 prize was won by home favourite Julian Alaphilippe (Deceuninck-Quick-Step) after he battled to hold on to yellow for 14 days during the race.

The super-combativity award is sometimes picked on the penultimate stage but usually on the final day into Paris, with the lucky the rider receivinge €20,000 for his troubles.

Combativity award Tour de France 2020: Winners so far

Stage one – Michael Schär (Sui) CCC Team
Stage two – Benoit Cosnefroy (Fra) Ag2r La Mondiale
Stage three – Jerome Cousin (Fra) Total Direct Energie
Stage four – Krists Neilands (Lat) Israel Start-Up Nation
Stage five – Wout Poels (Ned) Bahrain-McLaren
Stage six – Nicholas Roche (Irl) Team Sunweb
Stage seven – Daniel Oss (Ita) Bora-Hansgrohe
Stage eight – Nans Peter (Fra) Ag2r La Mondiale
Stage nine – Marc Hirschi (Sui) Team Sunweb
Stage ten – Stefan Küng (Sui) Groupama-FDJ
Stage 11 – Mathieu Ladagnous (Fra) Groupama-FDJ
Stage 12 – Marc Hirschi (Sui) Team Sunweb
Stage 13 – Max Schachmann Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe
Stage 14 – Stefan Küng (Sui) Groupama-FDJ
Stage 15 – Pierre Rolland (Fra) B&B Hotels-Vital Concept
Stage 16 – Richard Carapaz (Ecu) Ineos Grenadiers
Stage 17 – Julian Alaphilippe (Fra) Deceuninck – Quick-Step
Stage 18 – Marc Hirschi (Sui) Team Sunweb
Stage 19 – Rémi Cavagna (Fra) Deceuninck – Quick-Step
Stage 20 – N/A

Super Combativity Prize – Marc Hirschi (Sui) Team Sunweb

This page will be updated as the race progresses