Vuelta a España is a 'turning point in my career' says Hugh Carthy

The Brit has impressed throughout the Spanish Grand Tour, securing his first Grand Tour podium

Hugh Carthy on stage 17 of the Vuelta a España 2020 (Photo by Justin Setterfield/Getty Images)
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Hugh Carthy says his third place overall at the Vuelta a España is a turning point in his career and that he wants to continue aiming for general classification results at Grand Tours in years to come.

"This is a really big change. I want to keep fighting for good rankings in the future," the EF Pro Cycling rider said after the finish of stage 17, where he tried multiple times to attack the two men ahead of him on GC, race leader Primož Roglič (Jumbo-Visma) and Richard Carapaz (Ineos Grenadiers).

"We had to deal with a headwind and that didn't work in my favour," Carthy said of the conditions up the final climb, the Alto de la Covatilla.

"I had to try something, I tried to attack in order to move up in the rankings. I got a bit desperate in the final, but I tried anyway."

After Carthy had hit out a couple of times and weakened everyone's legs, Carapaz made his move at the perfect moment, launching away from the group and quickly putting time into Roglič. Carthy eventually also distanced the race leader, but neither were able to overhaul the Slovenian's 45-second lead on GC. Carapaz will finish the race 24 seconds down in second, with Carthy third, 1-15 in arrears.

>>> Primož Roglič says he knew he had enough time to secure Vuelta a España title

Before the start in Irún on October 20th, few would have expected Carthy to arrive in Madrid having secured a podium spot, and the Prestonian says he only wants to kick on from here.

"I am very satisfied with how my Vuelta has gone. This is a turning point in my career," the 26-year-old said.

"I don't want to slow down now, as there are still plenty of opportunities to come in the future. I can count on a great team, it is the perfect environment for a GC rider."

Jonny Long

Hi. I'm Cycling Weekly's Weekend Editor. I like writing offbeat features and eating too much bread when working out on the road at bike races. I'm 6'0", 26 years old, have a strong hairline and have an adequate amount of savings for someone my age. I'm very single at the minute so if you know anyone, hit me up.


Before joining Cycling Weekly I worked at The Tab, reporting about students evacuating their bowels on nightclub dancefloors and consecrating their love on lecture hall floors. I've also written for Vice, Time Out, and worked freelance for The Telegraph (I know, but I needed the money at the time so let me live).


I also worked for ITV Cycling between 2011-2018 on their Tour de France and Vuelta a España coverage. Sometimes I'd be helping the producers make the programme and other times I'd be getting the lunches. Just in case you were wondering - Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen had the same ham sandwich every day, it was great.