Midlothian joins other areas with improved refuse lorry safety devices

Midlothian council has invested in technologies that work to reduce collisions between HGVs and cyclists

Cyclists in the Midlothian area have been afforded the same safety measures as those in London, Luton and Cardiff when passing refuse lorries.

Midlothian Council has installed Cyclear System technology on four of its refuse trucks that illuminates a large disc at the rear to warn cyclists when the lorry is to turn left.

A sensor is also fitted that alerts the driver when a moving cyclist is passing it on the inside, to ensure appropriate action can be taken to avoid collision.

Midlothian is the first area north of the border to buy the £1,500 technology but Councillor George Rosie says that price pales into insignificance when it comes to protecting cyclists.

“Midlothian Council takes cyclists’ safety very seriously and is extremely conscious of the dangers posed to them when coming into contact with heavy vehicles, especially when turning left,” he said.

Kim Harding, a Pedal on Parliament founding member, says that making roads safer should remain the paramount for local authorities but nonetheless welcomes the move.

“I know a cyclist who was hit by a HGV who overtook him and turned left and it helps reduce that sort of thing then that’s got to be good.”

Source: Edinburgh News (opens in new tab)

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Chris Marshall-Bell
Chris Marshall-Bell

Chris first started writing for Cycling Weekly in 2013 on work experience and has since become a regular name in the magazine and on the website. Reporting from races, long interviews with riders from the peloton and riding features drive his love of writing about all things two wheels.


Probably a bit too obsessed with mountains, he was previously found playing and guiding in the Canadian Rockies, and now mostly lives in the Val d’Aran in the Spanish Pyrenees where he’s a ski instructor in the winter and cycling guide in the summer. He almost certainly holds the record for the most number of interviews conducted from snowy mountains.