Long-awaited Canyon Endurace update seeks to blend long-distance comfort with sprightly handling

Counter to the majority of recent bike launches, the cable routing remains resolutely outside of the handlebars...

Canyon Endurace update
(Image credit: Canyon)

Canyon has just released its long-awaited update to the well-regarded Endurace platform – although the changes are more incremental in kind than a drastic rethink. Which is no bad thing: we thought well of the outgoing model (opens in new tab) when we had it on test, while Fiona Kolbinger (opens in new tab) won the Trans-Continental ultra-endurance race outright aboard one in 2019.

The vision for the Endurace is a bike that’s both confidence-inspiring and endurance optimised, to suit the needs of new riders and experienced long-distance aficionados alike. But at the same time, it’s intended to also be a bike sprightly, and engaging enough to respond well when ridden hard.

These two qualities might seem a little at odds with each other, how can you have a bike designed for endurance and long distances that’s also a bit of a blast? Well, Canyon’s happy to explain…

Canyon Endurace: The geometry

Central to the long-distance comfort of the Endurace platform  is Canyon’s “Sport Geometry” concept. To help reduce “the load placed on [riders’] backs, shoulders, arms and hands” and “transfer more weight via the rider’s bone structure through to the saddle”, Canyon has kept the reach shorter – and the stack higher – compared with its out-and-out race models, such as the Ultimate range.

When put into practice, Canyon claims “this riding position allows the rider to maximise their performance out on the road by staying fresher for longer, without needing to commit to an intensive off-season stabilization program in the gym to make it work.”

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

The other part of the puzzle – keeping the handling sharp and the ride engaging – is achieved by mimicking certain elements of the geometry present in Canyon’s dedicated race bikes: “If we take Trail measurement as an indicator of a bike’s agility, both the new Endurace CF and Endurace AL lines, and our Ultimate family run around 60 mm in a size M for a comparable feel at the controls.”

Naturally, there’s a whole host of factors that determine how a bike feels to ride. Just to scratch the surface, there’s the total wheel base (also affected by the length of the top tube and chainstays, as well as the head angle and fork offset) the bottom bracket drop and the rider’s position on the bike – how low they can get at the front for shifting their weight distribution. 

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

There are still some differences between the Endurace and the Ultimate in these areas – beyond just the stack and the reach, the wheelbase is actually slightly longer on the Ultimate compared to the new Endurace. That said, overall the geometry is very similar and Canyon does claim that the Endurace maintains its “agility to respond and the accuracy to carve precision lines across the road.”

Canyon has long offered generous sizing ranges, and the new Endurace is no different. Going down to size 3XS and up to 2XL, everyone should be catered for from 150cm to “well over 200cm”. The two smallest sizes use 650b wheels (or 650c, for the pedants) to keep everything in proportion and reduce toe overlap.

Canyon Endurace: Capability

Clearance has been upped to 35mm, which if you’re thinking is a bit generous for a road bike, it’s worth bearing in mind that bit of extra space needed if you want to fit mudguards around the 30 and 32mm tyres that come stock.

Of course, you could just go straight up to that full capacity for a bike that can handle light gravel and heavy roads, whilst maintaining the speed, efficiency and handling of one designed for tarmac – in contrast to simply putting skinnier tyres on a gravel bike.

With gravel being a spectrum and Canyon offering so many models that cover all different parts of it, they’ve helpfully provided an infographic that clearly shows the intended terrain for each of their platforms.

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

Compatibility

The new Endurace hits a number of points that stand to make it friendly to live with. Notably, there’s now a set of bosses on the top tube for cleanly attaching a top tube bag – although the underside of the downtube remains mount free.

In contrast to so many recent launches, the cables routing remains proudly external from the handlebars, before diving into the frame around the downtube and fork leg. Likewise, the seatpost is kept at a common 27.2mm diameter, which also paves the way for use with Canyon’s own VCLS suspension seatpost.

Also, rim brakes still alive and kicking – at least for those outside of the US. For the rest of the world, there will be two aluminium Endurace RB models which won’t be available in the USA.

As with many other Canyon models, the fork for the Endurace comes with a 1 ¼” straight steerer, which is said to: “increase stiffness for enhanced front-end stability under heavy braking, and improved steering precision.” But it also means that a standard 1 ⅛” stem isn’t going to fit on the steerer column.

Finally, Canyon is employing press fit bottom brackets throughout the range, promising: “a better pedalling platform for rapid accelerations and extra zip when out the saddle on climbs.” And reassuming that: Extra attention is paid to tolerances in the manufacturing process with stringent quality checks to ensure long-lasting, creak-free, smooth-spinning performance.”

Specs

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

The range will start with the Endurace 6, which features an aluminium frame, a Shimano Tiagra 2x10 groupset, hydraulic disc brakes, 30 and 32mm Schwalbe One tyres, Fulcrum Racing 900 DB wheels and 50/34 – 11–34t gearing. The claimed weight is 9.4kg and the price is €1,399 / £1,399.

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon )

Next up is the Endurace 7, which also has an aluminium frame but takes a step up to Shimano’s 2x11 105 groupset with hydraulic disc brakes. The tyres are similarly 30 and 32mm Schwalbe Ones, the wheels Fulcrum Racing 900 DB, and the gearing takes a step up to 52/36 chainrings while the cassette is 11–34t. The claimed weight drops to 9.2kg and the price is €1,699 / £1,699.

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

First in the carbon line-up is the Endurace CF 7 and this comes specced with Shimano’s 2x11 105 groupset with hydraulic disc brakes. The tyres are 30 and 32mm Schlwabe Ones while the wheels are the Fulcrum Racing 900 DB and the gearing is 52/36 (or 50/34 in the USA) and paired to an 11–34t cassette. The claimed weight is 8.6kg and the price is €1,999 / £1,949.

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

Next is the Endurace CF 8 which is the same as the CF 7 except for a groupset swap to Shimano Ultegra 2x11. The tyres, wheels, and rest of the components all remain the same. This drops the weight to a claimed 8.3kg and the price is €2,299 / £2,249.

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

Taking the step to 2x12 and electronic shifting is the Endurace CF 7 eTap which SRAM’s Rival AXS hydraulic groupset. The wheels get a swap to the DT Swiss Endurance LN and the tyres to a set of Continental GP5000 in 30mm width. The gearing is a pairing of SRAM’s largest Rival chainrings at 48/35 and widest compatible cassette at 10–36t. This delivers a range broader than the Shimano groupsets at both the top and the low end. The claimed weight climbs to 8.6kg and the price stands at €2,999 / £2,949.

Canyon Endurace update

(Image credit: Canyon)

Finally there is the Endurace CF 7 All-Road which has an identical spec to the CF 7 eTap, apart from the tyre swap to a set of 35mm Schwalbe G-One Speeds. The claimed weight rises again to 8.9kg while the price stays the same at €2,999 / £2,949.

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