Pinarello launches brand new Dogma F12 and F12 disk

Boasting even more aero savings and a proper disc brake version, is the latest Pinarello Dogma F12 the best one we've seen yet?

It is hard to argue against the fact that the Pinarello Dogma, which has been ridden to multiple Grand Tour wins by Team Sky, is one of the most successful road bikes of the modern era.

So for us at Cycling Weekly it’s very exciting to hear that a brand new one is here for 2019, launched at the same time Team Sky rebrands to Team Ineos.

>>> Pinarello range explained

The new Pinarello Dogma F12 and F12 disc has been two years in the making, according to Pinarello, and has been drawn from broad technical know-how, using complex studies involving Pinarello’s leading structural and aerodynamic knowledge – but no mention of passion yet: not very Italian!

Like the previous versions of the Dogma F family first seen back in 2014 with the F8, Pinarello says one thing had to be maintained from the previous version and that is its ‘all-round’ characteristics, ultimately offering a fast bike rather than an aero bike according to Fausto Pinarello.

Pinarello Dogma F12

The brand new Pinarello F12

As you can see, the new F12 looks very similar to the previous F10 so what has changed? Well the headline figures suggest it is stiffer and faster than the F10.

Weight wise we haven’t got much information, although the press release claims a raw frame (not painted), unknown size, is 820g. Most interestingly here though is that the F12 disc is suggested to weigh only 20g more at 840g.

Complete integration

Aerodynamics of the new Pinarello Dogma F12 have been improved overall by eight watts at 40kph compared to the F10. That has been made possible with a new integrated handlebar and stem that now hides all the cables, which are routed internally straight into the frame – Pinarello claims a five per cent drag reduction here.

An all-new handlebar has been produced for this to happen from its in-house brand MOST called the Talon Ultra. The frontal area of the bar making up over 20 per cent of the total exposed area at the front of the bike means it is a fairly important feature to get right.

A smart split spacer design will allow for easier servicing and finer tuning of fit, which of course helps hide cables from the wind via a similar design found on the Giant Propel.

Pinarello Dogma F12

Split spacer design is a useful addition

The Pinarello Dogma F12 Onda fork and Torayca T1100 carbon fibre frame has also been reworked to save a further 7.3 per cent compared to the F10.

So, if my rough maths is correct that is around eight seconds saved every 10 miles, around half a kilometre an hour saved over the Pinarello Dogma F10.

Overall stiffness has been improved by 10 per cent thanks to a rework of the chainstay and forks. You also now get direct-mount brakes for the rim version and reworked fork for the disc version.

Pinarello Dogma F12

Increased depth of the fork helps counter twisting forces from braking

That means tyre clearance is upped to 28c, although you could just about squeeze 28s into the F10.

Pinarello also says that due to better braking of the disc version and the twisting forces associated with that it has been able to reduce the impact of those forces with the increased depth of the tubes on the fork and chainstay by up to 40 per cent.

Pinarello Dogma F12

More depth to the rear chainstay increase lateral stiffness

As for sizes, we’ve been told that 12 frame sizes will be available in both versions and the integrated handlebar will be available in 16 variations to hopefully enable you to find the right fit for you.

If we follow Dr. Hutch’s ‘Hutchinson’s second law’ it suggests roughly that a 10w saving costs around £1,000 and, looking at the headline figures coming out about the F12 that is roughly how much more the frameset will cost compared to the F10. We have the full price list below.

Disc brake version looks to be a more focused option than previous Dogma F disks

Pinarello Dogma F12 **Complete bikes price varies with wheels**

Frameset: £5000
Campagnolo Super Record £9,500 to £11,000
Campagnolo Super Record EPS £1,500 to £12,000
Shimano Dura Ace £9,000 to £11,000
Shimano Dura Ace Di2 £10,00 to £12,000

Pinarello Dogma F12 Disk
Frameset: £5200
Campagnolo Super Record £11,000
Campagnolo Super Record EPS £12,000
Shimano Dura Ace £9,500 to £10,750
Shimano Dura Ace Di2 £10,500 to £11,750
SRAM Red eTap AXS £11,250 to £12,000

Check here for a full review when we get our hands on it but you’ll be sure to see the Team Ineos guys racing it at the Tour de Yorkshire.