Ethan Hayter takes second pro win in bunch sprint at Coppi e Bartali 2021

The young British rider came out on top in the dash to the line after an undulating stage and now sits second overall

(Image credit: Getty Images)

Ethan Hayter took the third stage of the Settimana Internazionale Coppi e Bartali 2021 from a bunch sprint ahead of Shane Archbald and Nick Schultz.

Hayter (Ineos Grenadiers) managed to sprint to a convincing win on the third stage of the Italian race after a tough 139km loop starting and finishing in the town of Riccione, taking in eight climbs, three of which were categorised.

The final 10km was flat which gave sprinters a chance to regroup with their lead-outs and come to a mass sprint. Hayter looked to win comfortably ahead of New Zealander Shane Archbald (Deceuninck - Quick-Step) with Nick Schultz (BikeExchange) filling out the podium spots on the day.

After those front three most of the riders in the top ten were climbers or punchers, which showed how tough the day was.

There was no sign of Mark Cavendish (Deceuninck - Quick-Step), who took second on the opening stage behind Jakub Mareczko (Vini Zabù), being up there as he was distanced on the tough climbs mid-stage, but his lead-out man, Archbald, put in a very solid sprint.

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This is only Hayter's second career win, also his second in Italy, with his first at the Giro dell'Appenino in 2020. The British rider has shown good form this season with 22nd place at the climbing race of GP Industria & Artigianato as well as fifth in the mountain standings of Etoile de Bessèges.

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Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma), who won stage two of the race, holds onto his overall lead with two tough stages left to go after taking the GC lead off of Cavendish on the second day.

The stage win has meant that Hayter and Schultz are just one second behind the Danish Jumbo-Visma rider going into the final two stages.

The remaining stages are both tough ones that will suit riders such as Vingegaard. Stage four starts and finishes in the principality of San Marino with the final stage taking in seven laps around Forlì to decide the race winner.

The race is not televised in the UK, but it is a 2.1-ranked race that carries a lot of history and has nine WorldTour teams riding including Israel Start-Up Nation, Deceuninck - Quick-Step and Ineos Grenadiers.

Results

Settimana Internazionale Coppi e Batali 2021, stage three, Riccione to Riccione (139km)

1. Ethan Hayter (GBr) Ineos Grenadiers, in 3-49-21

2. Shane Archbold (NZl) Deceuninck - Quick-Step

3. Nick Schultz (Aus) Team BikeExchange

4. Filippo Mosca (Ita) Trek-Segafredo

5. Natnael Tesfatsion (Eri) Androni Giocattoli-Sidermec

6. Orluis Aular (Ven) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA

7. Vincenzo Albanese (Ita) Eolo-Kometa

8. Davide Gabburo (Ita) Bardiani-CSF-Faizanè

9. Cristian Scaroni (Ita) Gazprom-RusVelo

10. Simone Velasco (Ita) Gazprom-RusVelo, all at the same time

General classification after stage three

1. Jonas Vingegaard (Den) Team Jumbo-Visma, in 10-37-46

2. Ethan Hayter (GBr) Ineos Grenadiers, at 1 second

3. Nick Schultz (Aus) Team BikExchange

4. Iván Sosa (Col) Ineos Grenadiers, at the same time

5. Ben Hermans (Bel) Israel Start-Up Nation, at 3s

6. Javier Romo (Esp) Astana-Premier Tech, at 10s

7. Mauri Vansevenant (Bel) Deceuninck - Quick-Step, at 11s

8. Mikkel Frølich Honoré (Den) Deceuninck - Quick-Step, at 14s

9. Kevin Colleoni (Ita) Team BikeExchange, at 20s

10. Sergio Luís Henao (Col) Team Qhubeka-Assos, at 31s.

Tim Bonville-Ginn
Tim Bonville-Ginn

Hi, I'm one of Cycling Weekly's content writers for the web team responsible for writing stories on racing, tech, updating evergreen pages as well as the weekly email newsletter. Proud Yorkshireman from the UK's answer to Flanders, Calderdale, go check out the cobbled climbs!


I started watching cycling back in 2010, before all the hype around London 2012 and Bradley Wiggins at the Tour de France. In fact, it was Alberto Contador and Andy Schleck's battle in the fog up the Tourmalet on stage 17 of the Tour de France.


It took me a few more years to get into the journalism side of things, but I had a good idea I wanted to get into cycling journalism by the end of year nine at school and started doing voluntary work soon after. This got me a chance to go to the London Six Days, Tour de Yorkshire and the Tour of Britain to name a few before eventually joining Eurosport's online team while I was at uni, where I studied journalism. Eurosport gave me the opportunity to work at the world championships in Harrogate back in the awful weather.


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