Battle of the Bells: best bike bells of 2022

Chosen for style and function, these are the best bike bells for road and off-road cycling

Best Bike Bells 2022
(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

It wasn’t that long ago when attaching anything to your bike besides the necessary bottle cages and computer mount was frowned upon. Any serious cyclist was conscious about potential wind drag and strove for nothing but clean lines and empty handlebars.

Like the 23mm slick tires, those days are well behind us. Bar bags, bento boxes, stem pouches, computer mounts, Garmin mounts, lights, bells...handlebars these days are considered valuable real estate for mounting all sorts of things. 

And while some items may be overkill, the re-emergence or popularization of bike bell use among recreational and even competitive cyclists is a welcomed trend.

Bike bells were commonly seen as dispensable noise makers for slow-moving city bikers and children. No one wanted to put a cheap plastic ringer on their high-end carbon bike. But as it turns out, safety applies to all road and trail users, no matter how fancy your bike is. In fact, bike bells are actually a required accessory in many municipalities, cities and even countries—looking at you, Australia— around the world. 

Why? Because our streets and trails are heavily trafficked with a variety of users. A bell gives other users an advance notice of your approach that’s often friendlier than a shout and therefore can avoid collisions. 

While racers and bike messengers previously shunned the notion of using bike bells, this has completely changed thanks in part due to the emergence of luxury bells by brands such as Spurcycle, Crane Bell Co. and Knog.

Rather than affixing a cheap and obligatory bell to your bike, these companies offered something more: a well-made, durable craftsman product that’s as much a statement about quality and design as it is a tool. 

What’s more, with the booming gravel and bikepacking trend, people are wandering off-road and into nature. Here, it’s in your best interest to announce your presence to both an unsuspecting family of hikers as well as wildlife to avoid unpleasant encounters of all kind.

Seeing this newfound interest in bike bells, brands were quick to reinvent the ol’ ringer with a number of new innovations and styles. 

We tested a whole lot of bells—a carillon if you will—to find the best bells on the market today. Whether you’re a year-round commuter, a bikepacker or road racer, there’s a bell here for you.

Sound Test

Here's a video of the various bells, so you can hear them for yourself!

BEST BIKE BELLS

Best Bike Bells Guide

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Most Stylish Bells

Bike bells

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Stylish, artisanal, luxurious. Without a doubt, the luxury bell market is dominated by three brands or more specific, three bells: the Spurcycle Bell, Knog's Oi Luxe bell and Crane's E-Ne bell. 

All are made of durable, high quality materials. All feature a stylish retro design. All have a delightful ring to them. And all come with a hefty price tag. 

Rather than affixing another cheap, expendable and obligatory noise maker to your bike, with one these bells you're investing in a well-made, durable craftsman product. Beyond a tool, it's a statement that quality and design matters, even for utilitarian items.

Of the three, I found the Knog Oi Luxe to be the neatest, the Spurcycle the classiest and the Crane Bell has the nicest sound. 

Spurcycle Bell

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Spurcycle Bell

The classy looking artisan bell that made bells cool again

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22.2 - 31.8mm
Attachment:: Bolt-on with metal band
Color options:: Black or silver
MSRP: : $59 / £54.99 / €58

Reasons to buy

+
Beautifully made bell with retro appeal
+
High-quality, durable materials
+
Loud, enduring ring
+
Lifetime guarantee 

Reasons to avoid

-
Mounting system is a bit finicky

A high-end bell at home on high-end bikes. The Spurcycle bell was perhaps among the first bells to lead the normalization of bell use among 'serious' cyclists in the 2010s. They launched their US-made, hand-assembled craftsman bell as a Kickstarter project back in 2013 to astonishing success. Upon completion of their campaign, they had some 10,000 bells to produce — many, many times the amount they had expected or forecasted for. 

Today, there's hardly a group ride around in which you won't find at least one Spurcycle bell In the bunch. They took the market by storm and proved that not only are people interested in bike bells, they'll even pay upwards of $50 USD for one — given it's an artisan one made of high quality materials and comes with a lifetime guarantee, that is.

And indeed, the Spurcycle is a well-made, beautifully looking bell with retro appeal. Weighing in at a substantial 45g, the bell is precision made of stainless steel with a brass alloy dome and an aluminum striker to produce its signature loud, enduring yet somehow polite ring. 

At 30mm x 20.5mm, the dome is actually quite small for such a loud ring. And while there's no real performance benefit to it, many users —myself included— will mount the bell facing forward rather than up. This is mostly for aesthetics but it also makes hitting the striker easier perhaps. 

I've been using a Spurcycle bell since 2016 and can attest to its durability as it still rings beautifully today. 

I will say that the mounting system is a bit finicky and there are certainly easier methods on this list of bells. And with a current retail price of $59 USD / £54.99 , the Spurcycle bell is quite the luxury item.

Knog Oi Luxe

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Knog Oi Luxe Bell

The neatest bell of the bunch

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22.2mm or 31.8mm
Attachment:: Bolt on
Color options:: Brass, Matte black, Silver
MSRP:: $39.95 / £34.99 / € 39.99

Reasons to buy

+
Unique wrap-around design
+
Low profile bell
+
Nice sound
+
Neat cable integration

Reasons to avoid

-
Weak striker spring

Knog's entry into the bell market came not long after the Spurcycle success. The Australian company had already garnered a respectable reputation for its fresh approach to bike lights, locks and other accessories, all with fun designs and innovative features, and promised to do the same with their refreshing take on the bike bell.

Their Kickstarter campaign made a splash, doubling that of the Spurcycle with more than 20,700 backers and over a million dollars raised. But after all the anticipation (and production delays), the bell ended up falling flat. It looked great but the sound, while pleasant, simply wasn't loud enough. Whats more, the mix of metal and plastic made the product feel cheap and proved prone to breaking. Improvements were made and released as the now-called Oi Classic, and was made even better for the Oi Luxe version reviewed here. 

The Oi Luxe gets rid of any plastic. Instead, the CNC machined dome is met with a brass striker for a louder and clear ding. Both are attached to a stainless steel moulded frame with a vegan leather shim to prevent the metal from scratching your bars. 

Like the original Oi bell, the unique wrap-around design is the beautifully discreet and takes up only 1cm of handlebar space. There are channels molded in frame to allow housing to pass through, which not only looks tidy, It also prevents any cables from dulling the sound. 

These quality materials and improvements go a long way in making the bell ding louder and be more durable, however they do come with a heftier price tag. The Oi Luxe retails for $39.95 / £34.99 / € 39.99.

The bell comes in two sizes: small to fit 22.2mm bars and large to fit. 31.8mm bars

While I think the Oi Luxe is Knog's best bell yet, it still has issues with the striker. The bell with ding when riding over bumps and the spring is still rather weak and prone to bend. 

Crane e-ne bell

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Crane E-Ne bell

Best sounding luxury bell

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22.2 to 31.8 mm
Attachment:: Bolt on
Color options:: 11 different colorways
MSRP:: $29.99 / £25.00

Reasons to buy

+
Nice sound
+
Durable construction
+
Lots of color options
+
Nylon coating on attachment band is a nice touch

Reasons to avoid

-
Finicky attachment

Without any Kickstarter- or social media-generated buzz, the Crane Bell Company based in Osaka, Japan, has been humbly making deluxe bike bells for decades. Long before Spurcycle or the Oi bell were the rage, Crane Bell turned to high quality metals and timeless designs to help cyclists make their presence known on the busy streets of Japan. Their product line-up includes everything from beautifully hand-painted aluminum domes to futuristically shaped 'Rocket' bells. 

The all-metal E-Ne bell looks awfully familiar however. Far from unique in shape, the E-Ne bell appears to be a larger version of Spurcycle. It features the same mounting system, substantial quality materials, and a similar striker and overall design. 

But the larger brass dome does deliver a deeper, warmer tone that resonates a good 10 seconds. Another nice touch is that the metal band that secures the bell to the bars is dipped in nylon to prevent any scratching.

And whereas the Spurcycle bell is limited to two colors, the E-Ne bells comes in no less than 11 different models in variety of timeless chrome, silver, brass, copper and black colorways. The lower end models do replace the brass dome with a lighter, aluminum dome.

Best of all, is that this luxury bell Is much kinder on the wallet, retailing for $29.99 / £25.00.

Best Easy Reach Bells

Osaka Clip On Bell & Trigger Bell

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook// Future)

Right there when you need them, these small-but-mighty bells are neatly located near your shifter for quick access and easy reach. Whats more, you can place these bells anywhere that suits you best, making them highly versatile as well. 

For us, it was a two-way toss up between UK-made Trigger Bell and Crane Bell's Osaka Roadie Clip On Bell.

The Roadie Clip On Bell was the editor's favorite thanks to its versatile, strap-free attachment and minimal size.

Osaka Roadie Clip On Bell

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Osaka Roadie Clip On Bell

Tiny but mighty, clip-anywhere bell

Specifications

Attachment:: Clip on
Color options:: Brass, Copper, Silber, Chrome

Reasons to buy

+
Diminutive 
+
Tool-free, strap-free mount
+
Can be clipped to just about anything
+
Tiny but mighty

Reasons to avoid

-
A metal striker would produce a louder ding

Another Japanese company to make the list is the Osaka Bell Company. An internet search doesn't yield a whole lot of information about the company itself, other than its 10 products and goal to produce products with "Clear tones. Attractive sound. Pleasant communication. Enduring design."

While the bells perhaps lack in design when compared to the Crane, Spurcycle or Oi bells mentioned above, this little bell reviewed here is simply ingenious. 

The diminutive bell has a strap-free mount, meaning you won't be attaching it to the handlebars at all. Instead, the bell is clipped onto the brake lever hoods, cable housing, flat bar levers, bar bag or anywhere you please, really — the clamp needs just 8mm of space. 

To tighten the clamp, you simply turn the dome clockwise until you've reached a snug fit. Turn counter-clockwise to loosen it. 

I attached mine to the hood, which tucks it away neatly while also being within reach of my thumb, allowing me to ring the bell without having to move my hand.

The 22mm brass-alloy dome and nylon striker produce a surprisingly clear and loud ding for their size. The clamp is made of a durable aluminum and allows for easy, tool-free transfer between bikes. 

It comes in four color options —brass, dark chrome, copper and silver— and retails anywhere between $12 to $28 USD. 

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

The Trigger Bell

Best for flat bar and commuter bikes

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22.2mm to 45mm
Attachment:: Bolt on strap
Color options:: TBD

Reasons to buy

+
Innovative, below the bar design
+
Loud, clear ring
+
Versatile mounting options
+
Durable construction

Reasons to avoid

-
Hard plastic mount strap isn't very durable

Safety is at the core of the Trigger Bell, another successful product to have started as a Kickstarter campaign.  

The bell is the brainchild of London-based commuting cyclist Stefan Buxton, who found himself in a collision one day when a pedestrian stepped into his path. With his hands on the brakes, Buxton wasn't able to reach his bike bell. He swerved to avoid the pedestrian but collided with a car instead.  

The Trigger Bell solves that problem. With its patented under-the-bar design, you can strike the bell using your thumb while continuing to make use of your brake and shift levers — keeping your hands on the bars and eyes on the road at all times.

The innovative design features an elongated brass bell and an ergonomic trigger with a rather powerful spring. Combined, the deliver a short but loud ding.

The bell is mounted using a hard plastic strap and bolt. The nice thing about the strap is that it can be made to fit just about any bar size, hood, grip or shape. 

The strap and bell can work with a broad range of handlebars but perhaps looks cleanest when integrated with flat or commuter bars.

The only critique I have of the bell is that the mounting strap isn't flexible enough to withstand frequent mounting and re-mounting If one wanted to swap the bell between bikes.

Luckily, Buxton told Cycling Weekly that he’s currently working on making the mounting system easier by using a cable tie type operation rather than the current screw.  Additionally, the bell's sixth iteration, to be released in August 2022, will feature a shorter and wider bell shape to make it more discrete and even louder.

Luckily, Buxton told Cycling Weekly that he’s currently working on making the mounting system easier by using a cable tie type operation rather than the current screw.  Additionally, the bell's sixth iteration, to be released in August 2022, will feature a shorter and wider bell shape to make it more discrete and even louder.

Already a great option for commuters as is, this upgrade can mean only good things for when the Trigger Bell becomes readily available again.

Best Headset-Integrated Bells

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

When you want to reserve your handlebar real estate for computer mount or a bar bag or keep it free from clutter altogether, a stem or headset-integrated bell might be the way to go. 

These bells tend to have a stem cap mount or take the place of a headset spacer. 

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Portland Design Works Alexander Graham Bell

The longest ringing bell of all

Specifications

Attachment:: Steer Tube spacer
Color options:: Brass, black
MSRP: : $28 USD

Reasons to buy

+
Loud, enduring ring
+
Powerful striker
+
Timeless design

Reasons to avoid

-
Too large for shorter steer tube

Portland Design Works is a small company dedicated to producing beautiful, simple gear for everyday cyclists with the hopes of inspiring people to ride more often.

PDW products are engineered and tested for the everyday cyclist, in the same way high performance products are made for the elite athlete.

The products range from fenders and racks to lights and bells. While utilitarian in nature, PDW products combine function and style to enhance the beauty of the bikes they're installed on.

The Alexander Graham bell with its timeless design and bold ring is a prime example.

The bell consists of a solid brass dome, a large stainless steel striker and an 10mm wide extruded alloy attachment ring.

The bell is attached to the bike by replacing one of the steerer tube spacers, which means the bells sits vertically.

The bell is compatible with any 1 1/8" steerer tube, which is fairly standard on any bike produced after 1999.

The steerer tube attachments keeps the handlebar space free and looks right at home on a contemporary classic or steel basket bike. 

The bell's top selling feature, however, has got to be the loud, clear and long-lasting ring only solid brass can produce. Even folks wearing headphones will hear you coming.  Out of all the bells mentioned in the article, the Alexander Graham rang clearest and longest. 

The fixed attachment does means that this is not a bell you'll be swapping between bikes, but given the pure metal construction, one bell should last you a lifetime. 

I will note that if you have only a few spacers on their steerer tube, however, you might find —as I did— that you end up running your knee into the bell when climbing out of the saddle. One could, of course, remedy this by adding spacers above the stem but you know...aesthetics. 

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Arundel Jobell

Specifications

Attachment:: Headset cap mount
Color options:: Brass

Reasons to buy

+
Big, bold sound
+
Keep handlebar space free
+
Adjustable striker

Reasons to avoid

-
Rather beefy

Perhaps better know for its bottle cages, Arundel Bicycle Company in Texas was formed in 2000 after a trip to the Milan bike show. Although the Italian show had a great selection of product, the company founders left with the idea that they'd rather design and produce their own stuff rather than someone else's products. 

Their first product was the Dave-O carbon cage, drawn on a piece of paper on the flight home. The goal for that cage and every product since them is simple: "to come up with some cool bike equipment that people want to buy."

Today, the Arundel product catalog includes a range of every accessories like cages, inflation tools, bags and, you guessed it, bells. 

You'll see a few more Arundel bells appear later on in the article, but the Jobell reviewed here is unique in its mounting system. 

This big, bold golden orb of a bell sits integrated into the headset. There's a metal, threaded cap to replace your current stem/headset cap. The bell then threads into the cap for 'recreational use'. Arundel also provides a cover that threads into the headset cap for racing or when the bell is not wanted. 

The bell makes quite the statement both is look and sound. The Jobell sits atop your headset some 45mm tall and 38mm wide without the adjustable striker. The striker makes it 50mm wide. It weighed in at 69grams. 

All this beefiness produces a very loud, clear but rather high pitch sound. 

Unlike the other steerer tube bells mentioned, this bell not only keep your handlebars clear, it also —despite its size— did a good job in truly keeping out of the way. It sits in a spot where it's there when you need it, and out of the way when you don't. 

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Icredibell Striker Bell

Specifications

Attachment:: Headset cap
Color options:: Black, Silver, Brass
MSRP:: $15

Reasons to buy

+
Keeps handlebars free of clutter
+
Adjustable striker position
+
Powerful striker

Reasons to avoid

-
Stem cap paint strips easily

Similar to the Alexander Graham bell mentioned above, the Incredibell Striker bell keep your handlebar space free of clutter and sits vertically along the steerer tube. 

The Striker, however, is integrated into a stem cap (headset cap) mount which simply replaces your current 1 1/8" stem cap. 

The silver bell reviewed here is made of an alloy rather than brass but, when struck by the powerful hammer, still produces a loud and clear sound, albeit rather tinny. 

When mounted, the integration looks neat and clean. 

Production descriptions state that the striker location may be adjusted but mine was quite fixed. Safe from moving the entire bell around the circumference of the steerer tube, the striker remained quite fixed. 

Of course, the fixed attachment also means that you won't be transferring this bell between bikes, but it looks best on a steel roadie or city bike anyway.

Again, I ran into the same issue as I did with Portland Design Works' Alexander Graham bell in that I'd occasionally run my knee into the bell when climbing out of the saddle. 

Best Brass Bells

Bike bells

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

With flexible straps and easy striker adjustments, you can put these bells on your stem, on any size handlebars —including aerodynamically shaped ones— or even on your top tube if you’d like.

Arundel Clarabell

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Arundel Clarabell

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 19mm - 31.8mm
Attachment:: Urethane rubber strap
Color options:: Brass
MSRP:: $19.95

Reasons to buy

+
Strap and S hook make for easy mounting
+
Tool-free mounting system can accommodate various bar shapes and locations
+
Pleasant and friendly ring

Reasons to avoid

-
Strap could be longer to accommodate more mounting positions

Small bell, big ring! 

The Clarabell is Arundel's smallest, most compact bell. It features a polished brass dome that measures 36mm x 28mm dome that's struck by a pointy, nylon dinger with a powerful spring. The whole package weighs about 39 grams and is mounted to your bars or stem by way of a flexible, urethane rubber strap and S hook.

Whether you're swapping the bell between bikes or using the bell only occasionally, attaching and removing the Clarabell takes mere seconds. 

The sound is a clear and very pleasant and friendly one, alerting fellow trail and road users of your presence without startling them. 

Crane Flex-Tite Bell

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Crane Flex-Tite Bell

The friendliest ring

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22.2mm to 31.8mm
Attachment:: Cateye Flex-Tite bracket
Color options:: Brass, Chrome, Copper, Neo Black
MSRP:: $22.99

Reasons to buy

+
friendly, enduring ring
+
Durable construction
+
Easy, tool-free mounting system

Reasons to avoid

-
Removal is perhaps a tad tedious

This small and understated brass bell makes use of Cateye's Flex-Tite bracket, which allows for tool-free mounting on any tube that's between 22.2mm and 31.8mm in diameter. 

The narrow strap can accommodate aero shapes as well as long as it doesn't exceed the notched strap's 112mm length. 

On flat bars, the Flex-Tite strap can even squeeze between the grip and brake lever for a clean look and easy reach, allowing you to keep your hands firmly on the grips while operating the bell.  

The 33mm brass dome has a substantial weight to it and produces one of the friendliest rings of all the bells in this article.

Incredibell Omnibell

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Incredibell Omnibell

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22 to 31.8mm
Attachment:: Band/strap attachment
Color options:: Silver
MSRP:: $14.50

Reasons to buy

+
Easy mounting and removal
+
Adjustable striker position
+
loud, clear enduring ring
+
Inexpensive

Reasons to avoid

-
Could use a longer strap

The name really says it all. 

The Incredibell Omnibell is an excellent medium-sized bell for all bikes and handlebar shapes. The soft rubber band offers a secure fit, and is attached and removed in seconds. 

I am actually rather surprised that more bells don't use a simple notched strap like this. It holds up well, even on bumpy gravel terrain and provides versatility in mounting locations and shapes. 

The bell features a 34mm perforated aluminum dome that produces a loud and lasting ring albeit a tad tinny. 

The spring-loaded striker can be rotated 360 degrees to a position that suits you best, so you can use either your thumb or another finger to ring the bell.

For less than $15, this is a great value. 

Incredibell Ring-O-Ring

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Incredibell Ring-O-Ring

Universal attachment

Specifications

Fits handlebars::
Attachment::
Color options:: Black, Silver, Brass
MSRP: : $12.50

Reasons to buy

+
Universal attachment
+
Crisp ring
+
Easy and quick attachment 
+
Inexpensive

Reasons to avoid

-
Ring not as loud or lasting as its sister products

Another product from Mirrycle's extensive Incredibell line, the Ring-O-Ring aims to offer even more mounting options than its sister product, the Omnibell. 

Mounted using one of the two different sized O-rings, this bell can be attached to nearly any shape or size tube. 

Like the Omnibell, the spring-loaded striker can be rotated 360 degrees to a position that suits you best, and produces a loud sound. 

But the lightweight aluminum bell does provide a rather tinny, higher pitched sound that isn't as friendly as some of the warmer, brass bells on this list. It doesn't ring as long as the Omnibell either.

But the Ring-O-Ring is very lightweight, offers near universal mounting options and at $12.50 is the cheapest bell of the bunch. 

Best Off-Road Bell

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

When you need to keep your hands on the bars at all times and you want to announce your presence to fellow trail users or wildlife, a bear bell is your best bet. 

These bells provide a consistent jingle that announces your presence without having to manually strike the bell. This is especially useful on multi-use or two-way trails when you're wanting to let others know that you're approaching so no one is caught unawares. Likewise, bells are a common tool to let wildlife know of your presence In the hopes of avoiding encounters all together. 

The best bells allow you to silence the bell when you’re no longer wanting to announce your presence to the world and enjoy the peace and quiet of the outdoors.

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Timber! Mountain Bike Trail Bell

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22.2mm to 35mm
Attachment:: Quick release strap or bolt on
Color Options:: Black only
MSRP:: $24.95

Reasons to buy

+
Clear ring
+
Good mounting options
+
Durable
+
Easy-to-use on/off lever
+
Truly silent when turned off

Reasons to avoid

-
The bell is either constantly ringing or silent, no in between for occasional use

The Timber! bell was designed to be the first mountain bike specific bell that creates awareness when you need it and remains silent when you don’t. For years, bikepackers traversing through bear country and mountain bikers have clipped standard bear bells (or cowbells) onto the handlebars to make hikers and other trail users as well as wildlife aware of their presence. 

The problem though was that these motion-activated bells would ring the entire ride long. Using a regular striker bell is also suboptimal as it's not safe to take your hands off the grips mid-descend to ring it.

And so, seeing this void in the bell offerings, the Timber! bell was born. 

The Timber! bell is a solid brass bell with a black finish and a clapper inside that, like a regular cowbell or bear bell, is activated by motion.

What sets the Timber! bell is their patented on/off lever that controls the internal, retractable clapper. While the bell's dome hangs below your bars, the lever sits at the bar level for easy access. You simply slide the lever down to release the clapper cable and let the bell ring freely. Slide the lever back up to retract the cable and silence the clapper. 

The silence impresses perhaps even more so than the ring. It truly does remain silent — even over bumpy terrain. And when it rings, it does so pleasantly. 

The bell comes in two mount options: a bolt-on and a quick release model. While the bolt-on model offers a tighter, fixed mount, the quick-release strap allows for easy removal or transfer between bikes. It also allows for different bell placement - close to the grips for quick access or near the stem for occasional use. 

The only downside of a trail bell like this is that it's either continuously ringing or silent. There's no in-between for the instances when you don't want it ringing continuously so you turn it off, but then come across the occasional or surprising fellow trail user and are in need of a single strike option. 

Incredibell Trail Bell

(Image credit: Mirrycle)

Incredibell Trail Bell

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 2.2 to 31.8mm
Attachment:: Bolt-on
Color Options:: Black or Silver
MSRP: : $21.50

Reasons to buy

+
Consistent jingle
+
Compact package

Reasons to avoid

-
Weak magnet
-
too quiet

Mirrycle's take on the trail bell, simply named the Incredibell Trail Bell, comes in the form of a small metal bell with an internal clapper, attached to a spring to allow freedom of movement. 

The bell is silenced by a magnet-enclosed lever that can be flicked up onto the bell for silence and down to let the bell move freely.  

The bolt-on mount takes up very little space on the bars as the majority of the bell hangs below them. 

The clapper engages well enough on bumpy terrain to ring, but I found that the gentle sound is a tad too quiet and doesn't project very far. Meaning that if you'd be descending a twisty trail at any speed at all, the up-going riders or unsuspecting hikers wouldn't have much of a warning. 

Additionally, the magnet isn't strong enough to keep the bell in place on rougher terrain, allowing the bell to come loose and ring even when you've flicked the lever to close. This may not be as much of an issue on smooth gravel or sandy trails, but anything rocky will dislodge the bell easily.

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Granite Cricket Bell

One bell that does it all

Specifications

Fits handlebars:: 22.2, 31.8 and 35mm
Attachment:: Bolt on with spacers
Color Options:: Black only
MSRP:: $20.99

Reasons to buy

+
Two-in-one cowbell paired with a strike bell
+
Great value
+
Quality, durable construction

Granite Design is a small American company with a rather limited range of products yet a very global distribution. This is because the products it does produce are clever  and quality solutions to everyday cycling problems. The Cricket Bell is no exception. It's the one bell that does it all for all — commuters, gravel cyclists, mountain bikers and bikepackers alike. 

The Granite Cricket Bell is that elusive two-in-one combination of a cowbell paired with a strike bell. 

Out of the box, this bell initially acts like a hollow strike bell that's built to last. The bell is made of a brass/zinc alloy with a machined aluminum striker not unlike the Spurcycle bell. The striker delivers and nice, clear ding. 

Inside the hollow bell, however, you'll find a retractable clapper that's released when you pull down on the dome. In cowbell mode, the bell is motion activated and will ding going over any bump to make your presence known when you're riding on trails, busy multi-use paths or in areas with a lot of wildlife. 

Further pushing the 'one bell for all' theme, the Cricket Bell comes with several spacers to allow the bell to be mounted on various handlebar diameters or even, as I did, on a stem. 

And with a MSRP of around $20 USD, I'd say this bell is the among the best value of all the bells in this article, and certainly my top pick for mountain bikers and bikepackers. 

Best Kid Bell

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

Incredibell Bling

Kid-friendly bell without a striker

Specifications

Fits handlebars: : 22.2mm – 31.8mm
Attachment:: Bol-on or flexible strap
Color Options:: Diamond, Emerald, Garnet, Amethyst, Aquamarine
MSRP:: $15 USD

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to operate
+
Fun color options
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Unique shape
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Clear sound

Reasons to avoid

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Beware when purchasing: There are two models out there. One with a fixed clap for 22.2mm bars only. The other is adjustable and fits bars size 22.2mm through 31.8mm

Personal story: a couple of years ago I let my then two-year-old nephew pick out a bell for his new bike at the bike store. Looking at all the gleaming metal and brightly colored bells before him was a tad overwhelming for him, but in the end, he chose the Incredibell Jellibell in bright orange. I quickly regretted this purchase as he rang that bell the whole 25-minute car ride home. Two years on, that bell has since transferred to his bigger bike but is still ringing strong. 

This Incredibell Bling bell reviewed here is essentially the same bell, just in a different shape with a slightly smaller dome diameter. 

Bright colors and fun shape aside, what makes this bell so kid-friendly is the lack of a striker. The bell features an omni-directional rotating top which produces a crisp and clear ring. Continuous turning of the top equals a continuous ringing.

The bell is lightweight yet sturdily made (a.k.a toddler proof!) and appears to be quite durable. 

Why Brass?

Best Bike Bells 2022

(Image credit: Anne-Marije Rook // Future)

You'll have likely noticed that the majority of bells are made of brass. So why is that?  

Brass is a metal alloy primarily composed of copper and zinc. (Not to be mistaken with bronze, which is primarily composed of copper and tin.) 

The copper and zinc are then mixed with other metals such as iron, aluminum, silicon or manganese to create color variations and properties needed for the intended end use. Brass is malleable, durable and chosen for instruments and bells due to its ability to produce a clear tone. While the sound is not as deep or 'pure' as a bronze bell, brass is significantly lighter than bronze.  

Bonus: the metal is also highly corrosion resistant and will keep their ring even when painted. 

Cycling Weekly's North American Editor, Anne-Marije Rook is old school. She holds a degree in journalism and started out as a newspaper reporter — in print! She can even be seen bringing a pen and notepad to the press conference.

Originally from The Netherlands, she grew up a bike commuter and didn't find bike racing until her early twenties when living in Seattle, Washington. Strengthened by the many miles spent darting around Seattle's hilly streets on a steel single speed, Rook's progression in the sport was a quick one. As she competed at the elite level, her journalism career followed, and soon she became a full-time cycling journalist.