Are you sitting comfortably? Best bike saddles 2024 ridden and reviewed

Choosing a saddle is no easy task. We select the best of the bunch to help you find the right one for you

Image shows one of the best bike saddles
(Image credit: Dario Belingheri/Getty Images)

Even if you've only been cycling for a short time, it's likely that you'll already appreciate that there isn't one saddle to suit all. Take into account anatomical differences, riding style and chosen discipline and it's little wonder that one person's ideal perch can be entirely unsuitable for another.

All of which goes to say that finding the best bike saddle for you isn't straightforward. But given that it can make the difference between an enjoyable ride and a pretty miserable one, it's worth spending some time to get it right.

Men and women tend to favour different designs,  this guide looks at men's saddles, and we also have a dedicated guide to the best women's saddles.

From there you'll need to think about the kind of riding you do, whether it's long rides on the road, a short commute to work, or hitting gravel trails.

We've reviewed a huge number of saddles across a wide range of styles and price points. Below are our chosen few, selected with the aim of offering a variety of options to take into account the many nuances of the category.

After that we've a detailed guide to how to choose the right saddle for you, and it's well worth a read before you make your purchase.

The quick list

In a hurry? Here's a brief overview of the bike saddles on this list, along with quick links that let you jump down the page directly to a review of whichever bike saddle catches your eye.

Our pick of the best bike saddles

You can trust Cycling Weekly. Our team of experts put in hard miles testing cycling tech and will always share honest, unbiased advice to help you choose. Find out more about how we test.

The best bike saddle overall

Fizik's Antares Versus Evo R3 Adaptive bike saddle mounted on a seat post

(Image credit: Luke Friend)
Incredibly comfortable and supportive

Specifications

Sizes: 139mm, 149mm
Weight: 217g, 220g
Rails: 7x7 Kium

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable padding
+
Easy to clean
+
Effective pressure relief channel

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive compared to non-adaptive models

The Fizik Antares Versus Evo R3 Adaptive saddle features the Italian brand's 3D printed padding, which creates the distinctive honeycomb appearance. It's a high-tech manufacturing process that allows for the creation of what Fizik calls 'zonal cushioning', that's firmer in places and softer in others, allowing it to adapt to the specific cyclist's body.

It also features a full length pressure relief channel, a carbon reinforced nylon shell that's adds some flex and 7x7 kium hollow rails. The combination adds up to a saddle that weighs 217 grams in the 139mm width version that we tested.

On review we found the saddle to be very comfortable, with both the zonal cushioning and relief channel performing as you'd hope. Despite the appearance the holes in the padding made it pretty easy to clean dirt from the saddle with a quick spray of water.

In fact the only downside to the adaptive Antares saddle is the price, which is north of $250 / £250 unless you're lucky enough to find it on discount.

Read more: Fizik Antares Versus Evo R3 Adaptive saddle full review

The best long-nosed bike saddle with cut out

Best cycling saddles Specialized Romin Evo Pro saddle

A good saddle for people who like to love around on the bike

(Image credit: Michelle Arthurs-Brennan)
Best value saddle for enabling movement from tip to tail

Specifications

Sizes: 143mm, 155mm, 168mm (width)
Weight: 205g, 208g, 217g
Rails: Carbon 7 x 9mm

Reasons to buy

+
Length allows movement from nose to rear
+
Cut out helps relieve pressure
+
Soft cover provides comfort
+
Carbon rails reduce weight
+
Three width options

Reasons to avoid

-
Quite narrow

The Romin Evo is a long-nosed saddle, suited to riders who like to move around on the bike, sitting on the nose during efforts and placing their weight back on the climbs. 

We're generally fans of saddles with an ample cut-out, and we found that this one did the job, despite being relatively narrow. 

Specialized has used 'level 2 padding', and tested over rides of four hours+, we found this to be sufficient. The upper is made from a water-resistant Micromatrix material, which is resiliant and also quite aethetically pleasing. 

The saddle comes in three widths (143mm, 155mm and 168mm - we tested the latter), which should provide plenty of choice to suit most bodies. 

Initially marketed as a men's saddle, we've had male and female testers get on with this option - suggesting it has a wide appeal. 

Read more: Specialized Romin Evo Pro saddle full review

The best 3D printed long-nosed bike saddle

Image shows the Specialized S-Works Romin Evo with Mirror saddle mounted on a bike.

(Image credit: Andy Turner)
Best for comfort on a long-nosed shaped saddle

Specifications

Sizes: 143mm, 155mm
Weight: 192g (tested), 198g (claimed)
Rails: Carbon 7 x 9mm

Reasons to buy

+
Supremely comfortable
+
Keeps you planted for seated efforts
+
Reduces road vibrations and fatigue
+
Lightweight

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive due to the Mirror tech 

Made up of thousands of 3D printed struts and nodes to help distribute pressure, Specialized’s beloved long-nosed Romin Evo design is now available with the brand’s Mirror technology. The result is an extremely comfortable saddle which, rather than feeling like you’re ‘perched on top’, you almost feel like you’re ‘sitting in’.

We found that this made for a more connected feeling with the bike, with high-power seated efforts feeling very planted. At the same time, road vibrations were a little more absorbed and not transferred to our rear. The saddle is also very lightweight for one that is so comfortable, at 192g (measured) in a 143mm variant. 

The length of the Romin design works well for performance orientated riders who want to move their weight around as the effort dictates. Although an expensive saddle, its price is about the same level as rivals using similar 3D printed tech, but it is still a significant hike over similarly weighted saddles, such as the S-Works Romin Evo (without Mirror). 

Read more: Specialized S-Works Romin Evo with Mirror saddle full review

The best short-nosed bike saddle for racers

Specialized S-Works Power saddle which is one of the best cycling saddles

The Power has proved a hit with many riders

(Image credit: Wiggle)
Best saddle for an aggressive riding position

Specifications

Sizes: 130mm, 143mm, 155mm (width)
Weights: 159g (143mm), 161g (155mm)
Rails: Carbon 7 x 9mm

Reasons to buy

+
Looks stealthy
+
Lightweight, just 159g
+
Comfortable

Reasons to avoid

-
Not a lot of padding
-
Carbon fibre rails won't fit all seatposts

The Specialized Power was the saddle that kicked off the short and stubby trend that has since seen just about every saddle brand launch their own version. We reviewed the S-Works model but there are other price bracket options available too.

With a wide profile and sizable pressure relieving cutout, we'd suggest this is best suited to those who ride in an aggressive position, or spend a lot of time in the drops. An oft-reported downside of the Power is that the rear fans out, and can rub against some riders' hamstrings; if this is the case for you, then we'd recommend looking at the Power Arc, a variation which avoids this via a more rounded rear.

Overall, the Power saddle has collected a high number of converts across the Cycling Weekly team. It might not be everyone's absolute favourite, but it's rare to hear a rider say they find it uncomfortable. If you like to fix yourself into a set position on the bike, then we believe it's a solid option and well worth a try. 

Read more: Specialized S-Works Power saddle full review

The best short-nosed bike saddle for comfort

Fizik Tempo Argo R1 saddle which is one of the best cycling saddles

Another addition to the growing range of short-nosed saddles

Best short nosed saddle for a supportive ride

Specifications

Sizes: 150mm, 160mm (width)
Weights: 195g, 202g
Rails: Carbon 10 x 7mm

Reasons to buy

+
Comfort - great support
+
Well constructed
+
Better value than most brands' high-end saddles

Reasons to avoid

-
Oval carbon rails won't fit every seatpost
-
Slightly trickier to set up than a standard saddle

A short-nosed saddle which might feel a bit strange if the stubby genre is new to you, but we found the design incredibly comfortable.

Since you're encouraged to sit in a static position, the set up can take a little longer but it's well worth the effort. There are not many saddles that we've sat upon that offered us so much comfort.

This saddle is well suited to both road and time trial riding, as it really locks the cyclist into a set position, helping them to stay put throughout the effort. 

Compared to other short nose saddles, we found that a little additional padding on this version worked well and provided added comfort. The large cut out also added to overall satisfaction, and the squared off nose means you shouldn't experience issues with chafing at the front. 

For those who like stubby saddles, and want a large cut out and a little more padding, this could be a winner, and from a value perspective, this one comes in lower than competitors. 

Read more: Fizik Tempo Argo R1 saddle full review

The best bike saddle for rough roads

Ergon SR Allroad Core Comp saddle fitted to a bike

(Image credit: Tyler Boucher)
Best saddle for off-road comfort

Specifications

Sizes: 262x139mm (S/M width), 262x152mm (M/L width)
Weight: 288g (size M/L)
Rails: CroMo

Reasons to buy

+
Extra layer of bump-absorbing foam
+
Two widths and multiple rail/base options

Reasons to avoid

-
Men's version only
-
Heavyish on CroMo rails

Although you can use a road saddle for riding off-road and many gravel bikes come fitted with a road model, there are benefits in a gravel-specific saddle design. 

The Ergon SR Allroad saddle includes a layer of high-rebound foam between the upper orthopaedic foam layer and the base of the saddle, designed to improve shock absorption. Ergon offers two widths and versions with lighter rails and base than the Core line, which is quite weighty at 288g.  

Although marketed as a gravel saddle, we rode it on our road bike, where the effect of the extra layer of padding was easier to isolate than on a fatter-tired machine. 

A disadvantage of the Ergon saddle, at least for women riders, is that it comes in a men's fit only.

Read more: Ergon SR Allroad Core full review

The best long-nosed bike saddle for value

Fizik Arione which is one of the best cycling saddles

One of the most popular men's road bike saddles

Best saddle for flexible spines

Specifications

Sizes: 126mm, 140mm (widths in R1 model)
Weights: 163g, 181g
Rails: Carbon braided 10 x 7mm

Reasons to buy

+
A now iconic long and flat design
+
Range of sizes and options
+
Lightweight at 163g

Reasons to avoid

-
Might not suit the less flexible 

Fizik is famous for categorizing its saddles based upon flexibility and riding style. The Arione is suited to flexible riders and is quite a narrow perch, so it's best for the racer with a long and low ride position, which is why it's perennially popular with the pros.

The length provides plenty of room for a rider to move around and shift their weight as they climb and descend and to alter their position for comfort on long, fast days in the saddle, but the narrow width means it won't suit everyone. It does make the Arione a bit heavier than other saddles at its price though.

The Arione is an extremely popular saddle that suits a great many riders. There are narrower and slightly wider options, as well as a Versus option with a pressure relief channel and a Donna women's version in the Arione family. 

Read more: Fizik Arione R1 Versus Evo Regular saddle full review

The best bike saddle for gravel riders

Selle Italia Flite Boost Gravel TI 316 Superflow mounted on a gravel bike

(Image credit: Rachel Sokal)
Best pressure relieving off-road saddle

Specifications

Sizes: 135mm,145mm (widths)
Weights: 228g, 232g
Rails: Titanium

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent vibration dampening
+
Large channel for comfort in the drops
+
Flat profile and short length to allow movement around the saddle
+
Choice of widths
+
Choice of colors

Reasons to avoid

-
Relatively firm feel won't suit all
-
Short length won't suit those who want to weight the tip of the saddle on steep climbs
-
Not available in black

Given Selle Italia have around 16 versions of the Flite saddle it should come as no surprise that there is now a gravel-specific version added to the range. At first it's easy to see the Flite Gravel as just a marketing exercise. However, taking a bit of time to look beyond this you realise its a combination of various features that are best suited to longer drop-bar off-road rides, a sort of merger of the Endurance and MTB versions of the Flite. 

The Superflow channel provides pressure relief to the perineum when in the drops, particularly important on chattery terrain. Additional shock absorbency comes from a combination of the gel inserts and titanium rails. The covering material is Fibra-Tek  which offers increased durability against gritty abrasion. 

We were really impressed by the comfort of the Flite, the Superflow shape and choice of widths meant that weight was through sit bones where it should be. We found that the shorter length (250mm, standard across all Flites) allowed good movement around the bike although means your weight isn't so far forward if you want to perch on the nose of the saddle on steep climbs. 

Read more: Selle Italia Flite Boost Gravel TI 316 Superflow full review

The best bike saddle for time-triallists

ISM PN 3.0 saddle which is one of the best bike saddles

The noseless design is popular among time triallists

Best bike saddle for time triallists

Specifications

Size: 120mm (width)
Weight: 260g
Rails: Stainless Steel Alloy