Geoffrey Butler Cycles has closed down

The owners have thanked all of their customers over the last 40 years

(Daniel Gould)

Geoffrey Butler Cycles has closed down, the owners have announced, calling time on more than six decades of business.

Owner, George Clare, who previously rode for Scotland, bought the business in the 1970s and turned it from a local bike shop into an internationally-known company.

The South Croydon store was one of the first bike shops to offer a mail-order service in the 1990s. They also used to sponsor the Wembley RC team as well as the Team Clean TT squad.

Clare retired a few years ago, with his step-son Stephen Delaney taking over the business. During the 2011 London Riots, Delaney told Cycling Weekly of how he protected his shop from would-be looters. The shop moved location in 2016 after 50 years, but only a couple of miles down the road.

>>> Specialized UK headquarters hit by “devastating” blaze

GB Cycles announced on Sunday February 7 that it would be their last day of business, and that they had hoped to give people more than a day's notice, while also thanking all of their customers for their support over the years.

"We regret to inform you that Geoffrey Butler Cycles Ltd will be closing its doors today," a statement from the shop read.

"Our last day of business will be on 07/02/2021. After that date, Geoffrey Butler Cycles Ltd will no longer be offering retail or workshop services.

"The decision to close down the business was not an easy one, and we were hoping to give people more notice than a day.

"It’s been a trying time for all this past year; We would like to thank all of our customers that have shopped with us over the last 40 plus years, under the current owner, and wish you all well."

Jonny Long

Hi. I'm Cycling Weekly's Weekend Editor. I like writing offbeat features and eating too much bread when working out on the road at bike races.


Before joining Cycling Weekly I worked at The Tab and I've also written for Vice, Time Out, and worked freelance for The Telegraph (I know, but I needed the money at the time so let me live).


I also worked for ITV Cycling between 2011-2018 on their Tour de France and Vuelta a España coverage. Sometimes I'd be helping the producers make the programme and other times I'd be getting the lunches. Just in case you were wondering - Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen had the same ham sandwich every day, it was great.