Lance Armstrong attempts to qualify for the Beer Mile World Championships, and fails (video)

Lance Armstrong lasts only one lap of the four-lap course after discovering the 'Beer Mile' is harder than he initially thought.

As a cyclist, Lance Armstrong was renowned for his will to win and never-say-die attitude to racing, but it appears that doesn’t stretch to the world of the ‘Beer Mile.’

In the video above, Armstrong attempts to qualify for the Beer Mile World Championships, where runners have to down a can of lager after each lap of the track.

The banned cyclist’s cameo is pretty short, however, as he drops out after just one lap claiming the challenge was a lot harder than he anticipated.

“One and done,” Armstrong said of his Beer Mile career. “That was way different than I thought [it would be]. You might see me [at the World Championships], just spectating.”

While Armstrong’s presence in the video isn’t very prominent, it’s good to see him mixing fitness with pleasure near his home in Texas, having said that he struggled in a recent charity ride in California.

We have to assume that the Beer Mile World Championships aren’t USADA-associated, meaning Armstrong’s participation in future events will not be hampered by his ban from cycling.

Lance Armstrong attempts to qualify for the Beer Mile World Championships, and fails (video)

The banned cyclist pulls out after one lap and one beer.

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Stuart Clarke

Stuart Clarke is a News Associates trained journalist who has worked for the likes of the British Olympic Associate, British Rowing and the England and Wales Cricket Board, and of course Cycling Weekly. His work at Cycling Weekly has focused upon professional racing, following the World Tour races and its characters.