UCI votes to to limit number of terms a president can sit

UCI presidential terms will be restricted to three years under the latest changes to the governing body's constitution

Brian Cookson at the 2015 Annual UCI Congress
(Image credit: Watson)

Brian Cookson and future UCI presidents will be restricted to three terms in office under new rules voted in by the governing body's members at the UCI Congress in Doha.

The new rule was just one of the changes to the constitution announced by the UCI, which also ensures broader representation of the Continental Confederations on the Management Committee and increased representation for the African Confederation.

Delegates at the congress also voted through changes to the process of electing officials to ensure that elections are carried out in a democratic, transparent manner.

UCI president, Cookson, said: “Today marks another important step forward for the governance of the UCI. It is in line with international best practice and will help to reinforce the UCI's credibility within the international sports community, as well as with all our stakeholders.”

The UCI's Ethics Commission has also been amended, with three of the five members, including the president, being independent from the world of cycling.

President of the Ethics Commission, Bernard Foucher, said: “In order to continue the particularly constructive work of the former President Richard Leggat, who I thank, I would like the Ethics Commission, which can now rely on an entirely renewed Code, a composition of predominately independent members and real power, to help to its best ability the UCI’s different bodies ensure that the transparency and fundamental values of sport are respected.”

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Stuart Clarke is a News Associates trained journalist who has worked for the likes of the British Olympic Associate, British Rowing and the England and Wales Cricket Board, and of course Cycling Weekly. His work at Cycling Weekly has focused upon professional racing, following the World Tour races and its characters.