Vuelta a España 2022 route: New Asturian summit finish, Sierra Nevada and the return to Madrid

The route for the third and final Grand Tour of the season is set to test the legs with eight summit finishes

Vuelta a España 2022 route
(Image credit: Getty Images)

The Vuelta a España is the final Grand Tour of the year, taking place between August 19 and September 11 in 2022, and comprised of 21 stages. 

This coming season sees a return to the Spanish capital city of Madrid after a trip away in 2021 to Santiago de Compostela, reverting back to the Tour de France style of using the capital on the final stage rather than the Giro d'Italia's choice of providing hosting rights to Milan, Verona or other Italian cities aside from Rome.

The 77th edition of the race will start in the Dutch city of Utrecht, where the race was meant to start in 2020, before being reigned in to 18 stages within Spain due to the pandemic. The 2021 edition also stayed within the Spanish borders for similar reasons.

The first three stages around the Netherlands have already been confirmed with a rare appearance for the team time trial around the city, then a stage from Hertogenbosch back to Utrecht in a likely sprint before a stage starting and finishing in Breda.

After the rest day where the race travels to Spain, battle shall recommence in the Basque Country taking in the changeable weather and testing climbs are the race winds its way around the region visiting all three Basque provinces.

Next we'll see the first summit finish in the region of Cantabria as the riders hit the Pico Jano before heading into Asturias, where two brutal climbs await including the brand new Colláu Fancuaya.

The second week sees the race start in the south of the country with an individual time trial of over 30km between Elche and Alicante.

After that comes a brief visit to retiring Alejandro Valverde's home of Murcia, as the peloton makes its way to the savage head of Andalusia and the Sierra Nevada mountain range, including the mountain itself with riders going well above 2000 metres as well as the Peñas Blancas and La Pandera.

Then the final week sees, unsurprisingly, yet more climbing in the Extramadura with two huge high-altitude summit finished. The race then travels up to the region of Madrid with the penultimate stage being a sore one for Tom Dumoulin as it was the stage he finally lost red to Fabio Aru back in 2015.

To finish off, the race heads back to the capital after last year ending in Santiago de Compostela. The Vuelta returns to the usual laps around the city centre with a mad dash to the line for the remaining sprinters and a crowning of the overall winner.

There are eight summit finishes along the route, one less than in 2021.

More to follow.

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

Stage one - Utrecht to Utrecht (23.3km TTT)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The Dutch city houses the opening time trial, hosting a Grand Tour opening time trial for the first time since 2015 when Rohan Dennis rode the fastest individual time trial in Tour de France history.

This won't be similar, as we see a rare addition to the route. The team time trial seems to still have a fan in the Vuelta organization, as the discipline only seems to appear at the Spanish Grand Tour out of all the WorldTour races these days.

Stage two - Hertogenbosch to Utrecht (175.1km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Unsurprisingly for the Netherlands, the road stages are near to pan flat with mass sprints very much on the menu. Stage two of the 2022 race is no different. This will also see the first mountain points awarded.

Stage three - Breda to Breda (193.2km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The third stage is the same style with a pan flat day that will suit the sprinters, likely attracting some of the fastest riders in the peloton for an unusually favourable first three days.

Stage four - Vitoria-Gasteiz to Laguardia (153.5km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Likely to see the general classification shake up a bit, this stage has multiple attacking launch points, but will it be a GC contender taking the win? Or maybe a puncheur?

Stage five - Irun to Bilbao (187km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The classic Bilbao finish with the Alto Vivero featuring twice in the finishing circuit around the Basque city.

Stage six - Bilbao to Ascensión al Pico Jano (180km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The first summit finish of the Vuelta is often defensive as riders work out who is the strongest, but will this be different in 2022?

Stage seven - Camargo to Cistierna (190.1km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Managed well this stage could be a sprinters day, but if the ascent of the Puerto de San Glorio is ridden hard it will be an ideal day for any rider who can climb and have a good sprint.

Stage eight - La Pola Llaviana to Colláu Fancuaya (154.5km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Brand new summit finish for the race. The Colláu Fancuaya looks like it could be a brutal test for the riders battling for the overall title.

Stage nine - Villaviciosa to Les Praeres (175.5km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

One summit finish follows another, but this stage is even more vicious with crazy gradients set to push the riders to their limits.

Stage 10 - Elche to Alicante (31.1km ITT)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

For today's cycling this is a pretty standard length mid-race time trial with some GC riders, like three-time Vuelta winner Primož Roglič often stamping his authority on a stage like this.

Stage 11 - ElPozo Alimentación to Cabo de Gata (193km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

A rare day for the sprinters. The ones who have survived week one will be keen to have their teams control and not let this chance slip through their fingers.

Stage 12 - Salobreña to Peñas Blancas (195.5km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Back to brutal climbs with another summit finish, not as hard as in Asturias but still enough to test the best riders.

Stage 13 - Ronda to Montilla (171km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

This stage could be for anyone, depending entirely on how it is ridden. If there is wind then the race could be carnage but if it is steady and managed well this stage could possibly even be a sprinters day.

 Stage 14 - Montoro to Sierra de la Pandera (160.3km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The first of the Andalusian monsters is a great warm up for the next day, but this is a hellish ascent in itself with the riders finishing just under 2000 metres.

Stage 15 - Martos to Sierra Nevada (148.1km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The beast that is the Sierra Nevada. 2500 metres above sea level, this monster is a brutal ascent. In the south of Spain the heat could really prove the biggest test on the early slopes before the altitude becomes the main issue.

Stage 16 - Sanlúcar de Barrameda to Tomares (188.9km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

A lovely smooth flat day for the remaining sprinters, or maybe a breakaway if sprinters teams can't control.

Stage 17 - Aracena to Monasterio de Tentudía (160km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

No rest for the wicked. Back to climbing again. Not as vicious as in Andalusia but a climb is always a test to the legs.

Stage 18 - Trujillo to Alto del Piornal (191.7km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The climbing just keeps on coming in this final week with yet another summit finish. Officially the final summit finish of the race.

Stage 19 - Talavera de la Reina to Talavera de la Reina (132.7km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Unusual lapped circuit taking on the same huge mountain twice, but should be a testy ride with a breakaway win very likely.

Stage 20 - Moralzarzal to Puerto de Navacerrada (175.5km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

The penultimate stage of the race should test the stamina of the riders left in the mix. This stage harks back to the day Fabio Aru finally broke Tom Dumoulin in the 2015 race, taking red on the way.

Stage 21 - Las Rozas to Madrid (100.5km)

Vuelta a España 2022 route

(Image credit: Vuelta a España)

Back to the usual laps around the city centre of Madrid to close the 2022 edition of the Vuelta with a mass sprint expected.

Tim Bonville-Ginn
Tim Bonville-Ginn

Hi, I'm one of Cycling Weekly's content writers for the web team responsible for writing stories on racing, tech, updating evergreen pages as well as the weekly email newsletter. Proud Yorkshireman from the UK's answer to Flanders, Calderdale, go check out the cobbled climbs!


I started watching cycling back in 2010, before all the hype around London 2012 and Bradley Wiggins at the Tour de France. In fact, it was Alberto Contador and Andy Schleck's battle in the fog up the Tourmalet on stage 17 of the Tour de France.


It took me a few more years to get into the journalism side of things, but I had a good idea I wanted to get into cycling journalism by the end of year nine at school and started doing voluntary work soon after. This got me a chance to go to the London Six Days, Tour de Yorkshire and the Tour of Britain to name a few before eventually joining Eurosport's online team while I was at uni, where I studied journalism. Eurosport gave me the opportunity to work at the world championships in Harrogate back in the awful weather.


After various bar jobs, I managed to get my way into Cycling Weekly in late February of 2020 where I mostly write about racing and everything around that as it's what I specialise in but don't be surprised to see my name on other news stories.


When not writing stories for the site, I don't really switch off my cycling side as I watch every race that is televised as well as being a rider myself and a regular user of the game Pro Cycling Manager. Maybe too regular.


My bike is a well used Specialized Tarmac SL4 when out on my local roads back in West Yorkshire as well as in northern Hampshire with the hills and mountains being my preferred terrain.