Cycling connection was lost to waterfront developments, and cyclists say it is now a more dangerous route

Waterfront developments that meant a “major cycle connection was lost” are making cycling in Dundee dangerous, it has been claimed.

As part of the £1 billion transformation of the city’s waterfront alongside the River Tay, a designated cycling route on Trades Lane was ripped up to make way for the developments.

To compound matters for local cyclists, roadworks around the Tay Bridge and surrounding building site are making riding congested and potentially hazardous.

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“Some of my colleagues travel through the waterfront development and daily get very frustrated,” David Martin, chairman of Dundee and District Cycling Association says.

“If you think it is bad for cars, it is a lot worse for cyclists. Trying to find your way to or from the bridge and you’ll end up in heavy traffic.”

The first phase of the waterfront is scheduled to be complete in August 2015 with a final completion date set for two years after.

Officials do not dispute the impact of the removal of the Trades Lane route and other cycling problems related to the construction but stress that it is short term pain for long term gain.

“It is proposed to remove two sections of pay and display restriction to provide safe cycle contraflow against the main flow of traffic,” Mike Galloway, director of city development, told The Courier.

Mr Martin added: “There will be a good cycling route incorporated into the waterfront area, but it what is happening now that is concerning us.”

He suggests that enforcing 20mph speed limits in the town could help erase the problems all road users are currently encountering.