Female membership of British Cycling reaches an all-time high

British Cycling says that the number of women that are members has surpassed the 20,000 mark for the first time

Women's race, Lincoln Grand Prix 2016
(Image credit: Andy Jones)

The number of women who are members of British Cycling has passed the 20,000 mark for the first time in the national organisation's history.

BC reports that the number of women that have signed up for membership has grown dramatically since British cyclists' success in the 2012 Olympic Games, and has been further boosted by GB's performance at the 2016 Games in Rio.

The success of British Olympic, Paralympic and professional cyclists including Dame Sarah Storey, Laura Kenny, Lizzie Deignan and Joanna Rowsell-Shand has inspired a new generation.

In total, female membership has increased by 139 per cent since London 2012.

>>> Amanda Coker breaks women’s highest annual cycling mileage record – in 130 days

According to BC, 45 per cent of the 20,000 women also hold a racing licence enabling them to take part in competitive events throughout the country.

BC says that its oldest female member is 103 years old, with the average age of its female members being 39 years old. The average age of its male members is 42.

In addition to more women cycling, BC says that the number of qualified female coaches has increased by 70 per cent since BC launched its women's strategy in 2013.

The organisation estimates that over 250,000 British women are now riding regularly.

British Cycling is the national governing body for cycle sport, and the country's largest cycling organisation. Members receive insurance and legal support, and a range of benefits and discounts with cycling retailers. Membership starts at £22 per year.

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Nigel Wynn worked as associate editor on CyclingWeekly.com, he worked almost single-handedly on the Cycling Weekly website in its early days. His passion for cycling, his writing and his creativity, as well as his hard work and dedication, were the original driving force behind the website’s success. Without him, CyclingWeekly.com would certainly not exist on the size and scale that it enjoys today. Nigel sadly passed away, following a brave battle with a cancer-related illness, in 2018. He was a highly valued colleague, and more importantly, n exceptional person to work with - his presence is sorely missed.