Bono injures arm in New York City cycling accident

U2 are forced to cancel residency on 'The Tonight Show' after singer Bono injures his arm in a 'spill' in Central Park.

(Image credit: MARCELLO_CASALJR)

U2 front man Bono has injured his arm in a cycling accident in New York City, forcing the band to cancel their week-long residency on a TV chat show.

The 54-year-old, real name Paul Hewson, was taking advantage of a beautiful day in the city by cycling through Central Park before suffering a ‘spill’ that requires him to undergo surgery on his left arm.

A statement on the band’s website said: “It looks like we will have to do our Tonight Show residency another time - we're one man down. Bono has injured his arm in a cycling spill in Central Park and requires some surgery to repair it. We're sure he'll make a full recovery soon, so we'll be back!”

The Dubliner, who was in London on Saturday to record his part in the new Band Aid single, nearly came a cropper in mysterious ways on Wednesday when a hatch on his $78m Learjet fell off as it approached a Berlin airport.

Figures released by the New York Police Department earlier this year show that the number cycling accidents in Central Park has risen in the past year – most of which involve cyclists hitting pedestrians.

Source: Sky News (opens in new tab)/NY1

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Stuart Clarke is a News Associates trained journalist who has worked for the likes of the British Olympic Associate, British Rowing and the England and Wales Cricket Board, and of course Cycling Weekly. His work at Cycling Weekly has focused upon professional racing, following the World Tour races and its characters.