Specialized introduces Mirror 3D printed tech to Romin Evo saddle

The long nosed race saddle now comes complete with Mirror level squish

romin evo saddle with mirror
(Image credit: Specialized)

Specialized has rolled out its Mirror 3D printing technology to the Romin Evo saddle.

Mirror, which uses 3D printing from a liquid polymer matrix to create a material that is more tuneable than classic foam, was first introduced in the Power saddle base. 

In direct contrast to the Power, the Romin Evo is one of the best bike saddles for riders who like to move around depending upon exertion levels at the time, it has a 26cm long nose and ample cut out; the Power's nose measures 24cm and suits a more planted stance. 

The Romin Evo is now a unisex option, replacing the  Specialized Oura which was a women's specific saddle.

Specialized, which bought bike fitting company Retül in 2012, was able to make use of its millions of data points obtained via customer set-ups to inform its design and placement of the Mirror tech within the Romin Evo perch. 

Specialized Mirror saddle being raced

(Image credit: Jen Koester (Specialized))

The brand went on to compare a traditional foam Romin Evo saddle, with the same saddle bade, using the Mirror tech. The brand says it found that across five men and five women, pressure was relieved by 18.25 percent when riding on the tops, 17.51 percent on the hoods and 29.95 percent on the drops.

Features of the saddle include a concave shape carbon shell. This makes space for 22,000 struts and 10,700 nodes within the 3D printed material, a lot more than the 14,000 and 7,799 junctions on the S-Works Power with Mirror - the result being greater squish.

We've got a Romin Evo saddle with Mirror in the office and can confirm that pressing the surface reveals a satisfying recess, Specialized calls this a 'hammock' effect. There is still a recess, though it's not empty in the same way that a cut-out is. 

This option is available in 143mm and 155mm widths, forgoing the 168mm that is available in the standard Romin Evo; this seems unfortunate, no less for myself as (alongside many women) I do favour the largest width.

This Romin Evo Mirror is available initially in an S-Works build, which means it features 7x9mm carbon rails, and weighs only 190g but does cost £390.

We say...

I've been on just one ride using this saddle, so far - you'll have to come back for a full evaluation. Based on the first experience, I'd say that the rear of the saddle squishes down exactly as you'd expect based on the aesthetics. The surface is reassuringly sticky, and seems to hold you in place - which prevents any undue shuffling. The recess does relieve pressure when compared to a solid centre, but in the same way that the Specialized MIMIC technology wasn't entirely suited to me, my first ride suggests I'd still favour the empty thin air of a cut-out. However, perhaps more riding will change my mind... 

Michelle Arthurs-Brennan
Michelle Arthurs-Brennan

Cycling Weekly's Tech Editor Michelle Arthurs-Brennan is a traditional journalist by trade, having begun her career working for a local newspaper before spending a few years at Evans Cycles, then combining the two with a career in cycling journalism.


When not typing or testing, Michelle is a road racer who also enjoys track riding and the occasional time trial, though dabbles in off-road riding too (either on a mountain bike, or a 'gravel bike'). She is passionate about supporting grassroots women's racing and founded the women's road race team 1904rt.


Favourite bikes include a custom carbon Werking road bike as well as the Specialized Tarmac SL6. 


Height: 166cm

Weight: 56kg